Tag Archives: kate parminter

In pictures: Kate Parminter’s Burntwood Lecture on Brexit and the environment

Last month, Liberal Democrat peer Kate Parminter allowed us to publish her Burntwood Lecture to the Institution of Environmental Sciences in which she talked about the challenges Brexit poses to the environment.

Now the Institution has kindly said that we can publish some of their  photographs of the event.

Credit: Institution of Environmental Sciences

 

Credit: Institution of Environmental Sciences

During her lecture, Kate talked about incorporating legislation into UK law, establishing systems for compliance and enforcement, joining EU frameworks and improving on EU policy. She concluded:

It should be clear that achieving this aim – this vision of a government and society and economy fully committed to environmental goals – will require an immense amount of persuasion. There will be many voices in favour of the first vision I set out – of a deregulated cheap-labour economy which devalues nature and despoils the environment – though of course they wouldn’t describe it that way – and they need countering with argument and facts and passion.

Posted in News | Also tagged and | Leave a comment

A longer read for the weekend: Baroness Kate Parminter’s Burntwood Lecture on Brexit and the Environment

This week Liberal Democrat peer Kate Parminter became only the third woman (after Sara Parkin (1997) and Professor Julia Slingo (2013) to deliver the prestigious Burntwood Lecture to the Institution of Environmental Sciences.. She spoke of the challenges facing the environment from Brexit in a 45 minute lecture entitled “Separation Anxiety.” Read her full lecture below:

It’s an honour to have been asked to present the Burntwood Lecture this year, and to follow in the footsteps of such an illustrious parade of former speakers. Many of your previous guests have been eminent scientists or fearless campaigners; I stand here tonight to deliver this lecture (pause) as a politician. That’s not inappropriate, however: Lord Burntwood, the IES’ first Chairman, whose name the lecture commemorates, was himself a member of parliament and a minister in Clement Attlee’s Labour government. But more importantly, it’s not inappropriate because the great challenge of our time, the subject on which I’ve been asked to speak, is itself primarily political: Brexit.

How the United Kingdom manages its withdrawal from the European Union will shape this country’s future for decades. In the absence of any clarity from the government over what it sees as the final destination of this process, I hope I can enlist everyone here in helping me to draw up the broad approach the UK should adopt in dealing with environmental policy post-Brexit. I’m going to tell you what I think, and I hope you’ll respond at the end with thoughts of your own.

There are two competing visions for the future of the UK outside the EU. One – hinted at by some of the supporters of the Leave side during the referendum, but never fully articulated – is of a country free of the kind of burdensome regulations they liked to pretend emanated from Brussels; a fleet-footed, buccaneering, free-trading nation spotting openings in the global marketplace and exploiting them ruthlessly. This vision implies a deregulated low-cost low-tax low-value economy – with clear implications for environmental policy. In May this year, for example, George Eustice, the farming minister, attacked – quotes – ‘spirit-crushing’ EU directives, including, explicitly, the birds and habitats directives – and went on to criticise the use of the precautionary principle as the basis of EU legislation, a criticism echoed by many of his colleagues. You may remember that this kind of approach echoes Conservative ministers’ attempts, during the coalition government, to water down or scrap environmental regulations through such initiatives as the Red Tape Challenge and the balance of competences review – attempts which, happily, Liberal Democrat ministers ensured came to nothing.

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged , and | 5 Comments

Peers and pancakes race for Rehab charity

Today saw the annual Shrove Tuesday pancake race at the House of Commons in aid of the charity Rehab. You can read all about it and find some amazing looking pancake recipes from the likes of Paul Hollywood, Rick Stein and Gino D’Acampo in the official brochure here. Apple pancakes with Apple Brandy Custard is the one I want to eat most.

Here, courtesy of Terry Stacy, is the Lib Dem contingent of Kate Parminter, Rupert Redesdale, Susan Kramer and Dominic Addington in action.

Lib Dem Peers Pancake team

 

Where’s the pancake?

Posted in News | Also tagged , , , and | Leave a comment

LibLink: Kate Parminter: It’s time to stop puppy farming once and for all

HazelKate Parminter has written for Politics Home following her question on puppy farms in the House of Lords the other day.

She asked:

We need new legislation to tackle the appalling conditions that thousands of puppies suffer in the UK when they are bred for sale. Do the Government agree that no puppies should be sold under eight weeks and that all people selling puppies and dogs should have a licence, which will then give local authorities the resources to tackle puppy farming?

The Minister gave a broadly sympathetic but vague response.

Sue Miller followed up Kate’s question with:

My noble friend mentioned the very high volume of trade that takes place over the internet. Do I understand from the Minister that the Government intend to make sure that anyone advertising puppies for sale on the internet will have to have a licence number?

Describing the Minister’s answer as a “glimmer of hope,” Kate outlines in her article the change she wants to see:

Posted in News | Also tagged | Leave a comment

LibLink: Kate Parminter on puppy farming

Kate ParminterKate Parminter has written in the Huffington Post about her campaign against puppy farming. Under the headline “Parliament Must Do the Right Thing and Do What It Takes to Bring the Horrific Practice of Puppy Farming to a Halt” she writes:

Our nation’s love of dogs and the way we care for our pets often brings out the very best in human nature. But sadly when it comes to breeding, it can also bring out the worst. For most people, care for animals is instinctive, coming from a deep understanding of their vulnerability and need for love and attention. For a few heartless criminals, the huge demand for pets, dogs in particular, is viewed simply as an opportunity to make easy money, with no regard at all for the welfare of the animals that are at their mercy.

It is not enough to simply rescue and treat animals – we need to go further than that and stop the abuse from happening in the first place. What is needed is political action which tackles the problem at its source, not just putting a sticking plaster over a problem when the damage has already been done.

Posted in LibLink | Also tagged | 6 Comments

Kate Parminter to join post-election negotiating team

Kate ParminterAbout  a year ago, Nick Clegg announced that the members of the post-election negotiating team would be Danny Alexander, Steve Webb, Sal Brinton, Lynne Featherstone and David Laws.

As Party President, Sal will be closely involved in any post-election moves so it is appropriate that she should be replaced on the negotiating team itself.

According to Michael Crick, Channel 4’s political correspondent:

Posted in News | Also tagged | 17 Comments

Next week in the Lords: 13-16 June… God bless Her Majesty!

House of Lords chamberAfter the pomp of the Queen’s Speech, comes the dissection of its content. Of course, that’s not all that gets done, so let’s dive into the week ahead…

Monday sees the debate on elements of the Speech relating to business, economy, local government and transport, whilst crossbench peer, Baroness Young of Hornsey has a particularly salient oral question, seeking a view on how UK clothing sector retailers might ensure that people working throughout their supply chains enjoy safe and secure working conditions in light of the Rana Plaza disaster.

On …

Posted in News and Parliament | Also tagged , , and | 2 Comments
Advert



Recent Comments

  • User AvatarLittle Jackie Paper 26th Jun - 9:33pm
    Just write off the whole student loan book. It's no crazier than the right to buy.
  • User AvatarLittle Jackie Paper 26th Jun - 9:20pm
    More generally, a Norway type of arrangement would be very, very sensible indeed. And in fact the EU might do will to think about the...
  • User AvatarRob Parsons 26th Jun - 9:17pm
    Tim, I'm not in politics to get Labour elected either, but without some kind of understanding, we will let the Tories in time and time...
  • User AvatarGlenfordB 26th Jun - 9:13pm
    Pj points out that it is not philosophy that gets votes so we should tell people what we will do...and do you know my heart...
  • User AvatarLittle Jackie Paper 26th Jun - 9:11pm
    '10.Real estate prices will drop' Sorry but are you George Osborne? Falling house prices eh...Awful. Terrible. Stuff of nightmares. Really. Vote for the EU to...
  • User Avatarfrankie 26th Jun - 9:06pm
    Undoubtedly the government will try to blame the EU but as people get poorer they will find blame doesn't heat the house or feed the...
Sat 1st Jul 2017
Mon 3rd Jul 2017