Tag Archives: parliamentary boundary review

Paul Tyler writes: What would Keynes do?

Amidst all the sound and fury (from the Conservative benches), about the delay in implementing boundary changes, agreed by a substantial majority in the Lords last Monday evening, one important argument seems to have got lost.

When Labour left office in May 2010, we were given to understand that the electoral register was some 92% complete.  Parliament decided in the discussions on the Parliamentary Voting Systems and Constituencies Bill that this was a sufficiently robust basis for the redrawing of constituencies along strict arithmetic lines.

Subsequently, research by the Electoral Commission established that it was nothing like as complete.  Nationally, the figure …

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | 9 Comments

Constituency boundary changes are dead.* Unlike the House of Lords.*

House of Lords. Photo: Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of ParliamentThe House of Lords has today voted to block a reduction in the number of MPs from 650 to 600 as part of the review of constituencies that might have seen the Conservatives gain up to 20 seats. The BBC reports:

The House of Lords voted by 300 to 231 to delay until 2018 a boundary review necessary to make the change. … Lib Dem leader and Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg announced that his party

Posted in News | Also tagged , and | 26 Comments

Chris Rennard backs move to kill off, not just delay, boundary changes

PoliticsHome reports:

Chris RennardLabour peer Lord Hart has just tabled an amendment to the Electoral Registration Bill which would have another major impact on the timetable of the Coalition’s plans to cut seat numbers.

The amendment, which seeks to amend a clause in Section 10 of the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011, declares that the Boundary Commissions reviews will not take place until….2018. Yes, you read that right, 2018.

Posted in Election law and News | Also tagged and | 12 Comments

The Conservative candidate dilemma

Unsurprisingly, both the Liberal Democrat and Labour parties have decided to go ahead with selecting candidates for the 2015 general election based on the current constituency boundaries.

Where does that leave the Conservatives? In rather a tricky position given David Cameron’s talk of still pressing on hoping to win the boundaries vote.

Posted in News | Also tagged and | 1 Comment

Opinion: What the Tory backbench rebellion means for parliament

Failing to get reform of the House of Lords through the Commons shows a parliamentary asymmetry. There are enough Tory backbenchers to defeat the government, but not enough Liberal Democrat backbenchers to do so. One party’s backbenchers have de facto veto power, but the other’s do not.

There are three responses to this constitutional oddity.

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged , and | 18 Comments

Changes to your local party boundaries are coming

Next year all Liberal Democrats in England are going to have to get used to new local parties. The coalition government’s plans to change the boundaries of parliamentary constituencies across the UK, assuming they get passed into law, will have implications for how we organise ourselves at a local level.

Traditionally Liberal Democrat local parties have been organised on a constituency basis. The local party would cover one or more parliamentary constituency. More recently a change was made to allow local parties in London to be based on borough boundaries, but for the rest of England local parties remained tied …

Posted in Party policy and internal matters | Also tagged | 18 Comments

Q: What links the AV referendum, boundary changes & Lords reform? A: The Coalition Agreement

It appears the Tories are attempting a sneaky re-write of some very recent, and well-documented, history. What prompts me to say this? Let’s look at the FT’s Kiran Stacey’s report of Nick Clegg’s feisty performance at yesterday’s Prime Minister’s Questions:

asked why he was so focused on House of Lords reform when there were so many other more important issues to tackle. Clegg’s response was very telling:

There are other issues like changing the boundaries which I know are close to his party’s heart…

The Tories will absolutely hate that. They say the original agreement between the two parties was

Posted in News and Parliament | Also tagged , , , , and | 6 Comments
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  • User AvatarWilliam Summers 8th Feb - 1:14am
    I strongly believe in the need for more diverse political representation, including more women, BAME and disabled. But this simplistic one-dimensional identity politics really does...
  • User AvatarGareth Epps 7th Feb - 10:28pm
    Liberator is not preceded by a definite article. (You must owe us a sub!)
  • User AvatarSimon Shaw 7th Feb - 10:20pm
    @Mick Taylor "Labour have shown us the AWS guarantees the selection of women candidates and in a more favourable electoral climate would lead to women...
  • User AvatarRsf7 7th Feb - 10:15pm
    The problem with all this is that it only works one way. For example, men earn more than women but for the under 30's women...
  • User AvatarIan Swales 7th Feb - 9:56pm
    I'll leave my comment to a fellow member from the North East - “As a woman with a disability I find this patronising and insulting...
  • User AvatarIan Swales 7th Feb - 9:53pm
    You're right David and a lot of people who would benefit from it agree too. Here's just a few comments from a NE blog on...