Miriam Gonzalez Durantez supports Lynne Featherstone’s campaign

Miriam Gonzalez Durantez went to Hornsey and Wood Green yesterday to campaign with Lynne Featherstone. Here they are putting up the 500th stake board.

It’s great to see two women who have done so much to help women and girls in this country and across the world together.

If you have been impressed with her work over the past five years, you might want to donate to Lynne’s campaign.

Miriam said of Lynne:

Lynne is a truly progressive voice in Parliament, fighting for equality, promoting women’s rights, and tackling FGM. Lynne is one of the hardest working local representatives, and she deserves to be re-elected!

 

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15 Comments

  • This is the record of Lynne Featherstone. Doesn’t seem very progressive…

    Voted very strongly for increasing the rate of VAT
    Voted moderately against increasing the tax rate applied to income over £150,000
    Voted moderately against a banker’s bonus tax
    Voted very strongly against an annual tax on the value of expensive homes (popularly known as a mansion tax)
    Voted moderately for allowing employees to exchange some employment rights for shares in the company they work for
    Voted moderately for a reduction in spending on welfare benefits
    Voted strongly against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to illness or disability
    Voted moderately for reducing housing benefit for social tenants deemed to have excess bedrooms (which Labour describe as the “bedroom tax”)
    Voted moderately against strengthening the Military Covenant
    Voted strongly for use of UK military forces in combat operations overseas
    Voted moderately for reducing the rate of corporation tax
    Voted strongly for reforming the NHS so GPs buy services on behalf of their patients
    Voted moderately against restricting the provision of services to private patients by the NHS
    Voted very strongly for raising England’s undergraduate tuition fee cap to £9,000 per year
    Voted very strongly for university tuition fees
    Voted very strongly for ending financial support for some 16-19 year olds in training and further education
    Voted moderately against a more proportional system for electing MPs
    Voted strongly for greater restrictions on campaigning by third parties, such as charities, during elections
    Voted strongly against transferring more powers to the Welsh Assembly
    Voted strongly against transferring more powers to the Scottish Parliament
    Voted moderately against more powers for local councils
    Voted moderately for requiring the mass retention of information about communications
    Voted very strongly for capping civil service redundancy payments
    Voted strongly against slowing the rise in rail fares
    Voted very strongly for selling England’s state owned forests
    Voted moderately for the privatisation of Royal Mail
    Voted moderately for culling badgers to tackle bovine tuberculosis
    Voted moderately for restricting the scope of legal aid
    Voted moderately against restrictions on fees charged to tenants by letting agents

  • Jimbob mistakes votes in the Westminster Bubble with politics in the real world.
    Unfortunately reeling off a list of how a minister in a coalition government voted tells you nothing about the efforts of that minister.
    Lynne Featherstone was one of the success stories as a minister. if Jimbo cannot recognise that then maybe he has an agenda other than establishing the facts.

  • Suppose it all depends on what you mean by “Progressive”. One persons progressive is another’s regressive. Still that’s politics.

  • “Jimbob mistakes votes in the Westminster Bubble with politics in the real world.
    Unfortunately reeling off a list of how a minister in a coalition government voted tells you nothing about the efforts of that minister.
    Lynne Featherstone was one of the success stories as a minister. if Jimbo cannot recognise that then maybe he has an agenda other than establishing the facts.”

    I’ve just fallen off my chair in amazement. Well said, John Tilley.

  • chrisjsmart 9th Apr '15 - 12:49pm

    So being a minister in a coalition means voting like a Tory rather than abstaining on things you disapprove of (or conference has agreed is lib dem policy). No wonder the average voter is disillusioned with Westminster politics and trust in the LIb Dems has been totally destroyed.

  • chrisjsmart 9th Apr '15 - 1:01pm

    sorry must amend to
    So being a minister in a coalition means voting like a Tory rather than abstaining on things you disapprove of (or voting against that which conference has agreed is lib dem policy). No wonder the average voter is disillusioned with Westminster politics and trust in the LIb Dems has been totally destroyed.

  • chrisjsmart

    “So being a minister in a coalition means voting like a Tory rather than abstaining on things you disapprove of (or voting against that which conference has agreed is lib dem policy). No wonder the average voter is disillusioned with Westminster politics and trust in the LIb Dems has been totally destroyed.”

    Where do I start with this?

    How do you think either party passes its legislation when both parties are required to carry a majority vote in parliament? If either party abstains, then the votes of the opposition parties are sufficient to defeat the government.

    Hence once the coalition agreement is signed the government has to support all elements of the deal.

    Unlike yourself, most normal people appreciate how compromise works and why you have to do it.

  • David Evans 9th Apr '15 - 1:19pm

    Sadly that is what Nick et al agreed at the very start. Cabinet Collective responsibility was agreed in toto. Thus the party that was going to do a different form of politics turned into another bunch of Westminster bureaucrats (the ones with the blue badge rather than the same bunch of bureaucrats with the red badge).

    It was either
    a total misjudgement for a real Liberal Democrat OR
    a masterstroke for a someone desperate to find a means to enforce his own agenda on a whole party by controlling it from the top down
    (chose one or other as appropriate depending on how you see it fitting the facts).

  • “It was either
    a total misjudgement for a real Liberal Democrat OR
    a masterstroke for a someone desperate to find a means to enforce his own agenda on a whole party by controlling it from the top down
    (chose one or other as appropriate depending on how you see it fitting the facts).”

    Or it was a sensible way to conclude coalition negotiations given the timescales and the facts at his disposal.

  • Unfortunately her voting record may come back to bite her – she may have been too loyal to Clegg. I would have liked Tim Farron and Lynne Featherstone as the next leadership team, but I can’t see her holding her seat. A shame because I think she is a person that people can easily relate to and has been a decent minister. Labour are best odds of 4/11 to gain Hornsey and Woodgreen.

  • I still fail to grasp why it is hugely, vitally important for a government to pass legislation for its own sake. Why should I be shocked at the prospect that a government’s legislation might fail as the result of abstentions when that legislation is bad? Shouldn’t coalition have ushered in a new type of government, one where the government is not guaranteed legislative success, especially when it goes against the principles of one of the coalition partners?

    Compromise means doing the things that both partners agree on and not doing the other things. The fact that Clegg & Co. seem to have thought that compromise meant doing what the Tories wanted is why we are losing these elections.

  • David-1 9th Apr ’15 – 4:02pm
    “…,,, Shouldn’t coalition have ushered in a new type of government, one where the government is not guaranteed legislative success, especially when it goes against the principles of one of the coalition partners?”

    Yes indeed there was an opportunity to do this but it was not taken.
    There was a chance to change things – especially in the summer of 2010. A chance to actually delver what Clegg himself had promised repeatedly throughout the election and indeed since becoming an MP himself in 2005.

    Why didn’t he make at least sme of the changes he had promised?
    Why did he change virtually nothing? These were not things which had any impact on the defecit! Why did The Commons carry on exactly as before in the time warp of 18th Century flmmery?
    Why did Clegg agree to the bizarre seating arrangement in The Commons whereby he was cut off from other Liberal Democrat MPs? Why didhe agree to be surrounded by Tories and forced to sit in full view of the cameras for 5 years nodding like a dog to everything Cameron said every Wednesday at PMQs??
    Why was there no change to the ludicrous “My Honourable Friend” nonsense — it turned my stomach every time he or any Liberal Democrat minister said this to some rabid rightwing backwoods Tory.

    So many missed opportunities!

  • Sadie Smith 10th Apr '15 - 9:04am

    Agree about seating arrangements, though I think the Speaker would have gone bananas.
    Anyone who has been a lone voice on part of a Council learns fast to be unpredictable in location. Speaker comment still applies, tho.
    Lynne is one of the people who achieved at least as much as a member of the Cabinet from outside it, so she has a really good record in changing things. She has chosen her battles. Not a bad decision and one she could pretty well control.

  • Tabman

    You totally miss the point I was making. If coalition means doing what was done over the last 5 years then it is inevitable that, whatever the good intentions of the junior partner acting this way, means total lack of trust and total confusion in the voter’s mind. Why vote for the minority partner ? all your theoretical politicking makes no impact on the voter other than total lack of trust and disillusion. I have voted Lib and Lib Dem all my life and consider myself reasonably sophisticated in my understanding of politics. I feel betrayed and probable won’t vote for the party again until it returns to its traditional beliefs and acts on the basis of those principles. I think a very large proportion of the party agrees with me and the reason why the membership has been decimated.

  • chrisjsmart 10th Apr ’15 – 10:07am
    “………………..I have voted Lib and Lib Dem all my life and consider myself reasonably sophisticated in my understanding of politics.
    I feel betrayed and probable won’t vote for the party again until it returns to its traditional beliefs and acts on the basis of those principles.
    I think a very large proportion of the party agrees with me and the reason why the membership has been decimated.”

    Yes, Chris, the proof of the pudding is in the eating. It is time for people at the top of our party to start listening to people like you. To recognise the facts, not just of the last five years but the last ten years or so.

    Our party will get buried if it does not go forward with — “.. its traditional beliefs and acts on the basis of those principles. “

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