Tag Archives: world refugee day

For World Refugee Day: Protecting climate refugees

International awareness of the climate emergency has arguably never been higher. The move to decarbonise much of our economy and society to tackle the causes of global warming at source has begun to accelerate. In the UK, we are even starting to have entire days and weeks where our national grid is powered without the use of harmful fossil fuels.

All of this action is taken to avoid the mass loss of life, livelihoods, jobs, and the environment that the climate crisis threatens. Other people living around the world are, tragically, already living with the consequences.
Of the estimated 65 million displaced persons around the world, 20 million are believed to have been displaced as a result of the climate crisis.

Currently, the United Nations operates under the 1951 Refugee Convention’s definition of refugees and legitimate claims of asylum. Like those fleeing war or famine, climate refugees have been displaced both as a direct and indirect consequence of global warming. Permanent destruction of crop yields, for example, has made living and working in some areas impossible.

Displacement and mass movement puts pressure on natural resources, services, and can ignite political tensions. Despite this, those seeking safety following displacement as a result of the climate emergency are not legally protected. As the climate crisis inevitably worsens year on year, millions more become at risk of being displaced with no protection; the vulnerable becoming more vulnerable.

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | 2 Comments

Ed Davey writes…World Refugee Day: Restoring compassion and dignity

Today is World Refugee Day – when we celebrate the amazing contributions that refugees make to the social, cultural and economic life of our country, and raise awareness of the 29 million refugees and asylum seekers around the world.

Every minute, 30 people are forced to flee their homes to escape the horrors of war, violence or persecution.

This is the biggest refugee crisis in history. The number of refugees has doubled in the last fifteen years. More than half of them are children. Over 6 million refugees are from Syria.

The UK has a long and proud record of providing asylum to seekers of sanctuary – from Jews escaping Nazi Germany to Sri Lankans, Somalians and Syrians fleeing civil war.

But now, the Conservatives seem determined to make our asylum system as cruel and unwelcoming as possible.

The clearest example is the inexplicable ban on asylum seekers working while their claims are processed. Thousands of people are left waiting for months for a decision, dependent on a government handout of £37.75 a week.

Allowing asylum seekers to work is a no-brainer. It’s good for them, good for businesses and good for taxpayers. That’s why the Liberal Democrats have tabled legislation to give asylum seekers the right to work if they’ve been waiting for more than three months.

The Government must also stop locking up asylum seekers – including victims of torture – in detention centres with no idea when they’ll be released. It’s inhumane, unnecessary and expensive.

The Liberal Democrats believe detention should be an absolute last resort, and we are supporting cross-party efforts to impose a 28-day time limit on detention.

Beyond these clear issues, though, is a pernicious culture at the Home Office that means asylum seekers are treated appallingly. It has a shockingly poor record on getting decisions right, with 44% of appeals upheld by a judge.

Officials treat even the most vulnerable people with callous suspicion. This is particularly bad for LGBT+ asylum seekers, who are often asked to prove their sexuality in humiliating ways. Some are asked explicit questions about sex lives, while others are forced to produce screenshots of their conversations on dating sites, or statements from former partners.

Posted in Op-eds | 1 Comment
Advert



Recent Comments

  • Chris Moore
    So we can put it less dramatically: the GOVERNMENT will be paying interest on the new debt for many years to come. That isn't necessarily a good thing....
  • matt
    I think it says it all when you see the wealthy woman coming out of Selfridges and says that she thinks the Tax cuts for the wealthiest are good as it allows he...
  • Roland
    @Jenny Barnes - Thanks for the clarity of your point, confirming I'm not the only one who thinks there are ulterior motives behind this car crash of a budget. ...
  • Nonconformistradical
    A quick search on https://ethos.bl.uk/ shows Kwarteng's PhD thesis subject as "The political thought of the recoinage crisis of 1695-7" And then I found ht...
  • Denis Loretto
    Like William Townsend says. No-brainer....