Author Archives: James Cox

“How many children will die?” is the question we should be asking on international aid.

Just half a decade after the Coalition enshrined 0.7% of GDP spending to go to international aid into law, the Conservative government looks set to rip it out this week.

Given Johnson’s penchant for populism and his Chancellor’s desire to get public spending back to pre-Covid levels, it is not surprising to see international aid attacked so passionately and so disproportionately. ‘Foreign aid’ has long been the whipping body of the right-wing press, Nigel Farage, and the Tax-Payers Alliance.

Much like the European Union and freedom of movement, international aid has gone largely undefended. Whilst we see obvious merit in funding …

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged and | 15 Comments

Enough talk about pacts, let’s make votes matter!

Last year, I participated in an experiment. After more than a year of solid campaigning in anticipation of a general election, I stood aside in favour of a formal electoral alliance of different parties devised in order to maximise their number of seats and try to stop Brexit. Whilst the success and tactical merits of the Unite to Remain alliance can be debated at length, it at least saw parties band together in common purpose and try to play the first-past-the-post system against itself.

This controversial proposal was consistently met by claims from anti-reform politicians, including the Labour MP in whose constituency I stood aside and tried to unseat, that we were being anti-democratic, denying voters their right to vote for the candidate or party they most believed in, and for trying to rig elections for our own political ends. There may well be some merit to these claims, but what these politicians have to confront is that the same criticism they had could be applied directly to FPTP.

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged | 36 Comments

For World Refugee Day: Protecting climate refugees

International awareness of the climate emergency has arguably never been higher. The move to decarbonise much of our economy and society to tackle the causes of global warming at source has begun to accelerate. In the UK, we are even starting to have entire days and weeks where our national grid is powered without the use of harmful fossil fuels.

All of this action is taken to avoid the mass loss of life, livelihoods, jobs, and the environment that the climate crisis threatens. Other people living around the world are, tragically, already living with the consequences.
Of the estimated 65 million displaced persons around the world, 20 million are believed to have been displaced as a result of the climate crisis.

Currently, the United Nations operates under the 1951 Refugee Convention’s definition of refugees and legitimate claims of asylum. Like those fleeing war or famine, climate refugees have been displaced both as a direct and indirect consequence of global warming. Permanent destruction of crop yields, for example, has made living and working in some areas impossible.

Displacement and mass movement puts pressure on natural resources, services, and can ignite political tensions. Despite this, those seeking safety following displacement as a result of the climate emergency are not legally protected. As the climate crisis inevitably worsens year on year, millions more become at risk of being displaced with no protection; the vulnerable becoming more vulnerable.

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged and | 2 Comments

Offer amnesty to end hostile environment

The Conservatives finally published their immigration white paper before the Christmas break, setting out their vision of how immigration policy would work after Brexit. 

The Lib Dem response was robust and clear, setting out redlines on scrapping the net migration target, limiting immigration detention and lifting the working ban on asylum seekers to name a few. But our approach to the estimated one million population of illegal migrations living and working in the UK seemed to be lacking a strong, decent and Liberal solution.

Windrush, after Brexit, was the biggest story of

Posted in News and Op-eds | 2 Comments
Advert



Recent Comments

  • Alex Macfie
    Michael 1: Apart from the arithmetical error (4.7% going down to 3% is not half), what makes you think a third (as it actually is, approximately) of the Lib Dem...
  • Michael 1
    @nvelope2003 Article 24 of the Lib Dem constitution outlines how the Liberal Democrats would act in the event of "Support for a government which contains ot...
  • Michael 1
    @Simon Hebditch Thanks for your comment. The Labour party didn't advise its supporters to vote Liberal Democrat in Chesham and Amersham - although clearly...
  • Simon Hebditch
    As a supporter of the so-called progressive alliance, I welcome the Lib Dem victory in Chesham and Amersham. Clearly, thousands of Labour voters decided to supp...
  • John Marriott
    I cannot call on any scientific evidence for the following; but I have always been fascinated by the statements of winning candidates, when they affirm that it ...