Two thirds of Tory members want a no deal Brexit so voting Lib Dem to stop Brexit on Thursday is more important than ever

There are many reasons to vote Lib Dem on Thursday, but sending an indisputable “Stop Brexit” message, showing that the country has changed its mind, is even more important when you consider the recent YouGov poll of Tory members. 

These people, and these people alone, get to choose the next Prime Minister.

And two thirds of them want to visit on us the catastrophe of a no deal Brexit.

84% of them want to deny us our say on the final Brexit deal.

These mostly affluent, older people are quite happy to play Russian Roulette with all of our lives and there are plenty leadership candidates prepared to promise them what they want.

We’ve been saying all along that a vote for the Lib Dems is a vote to stop Brexit. It sends an indisputable message to the Government. It can’t be confused with Scottish independence. And if you want to Remain, why would you even vote for the Brexit Labour Party?

It is worth dropping everything and doing whatever you can to secure a huge Lib Dem vote in your area.

This election is not just about getting lots of MEPs for us, it is about the future direction of our country. It’s about showing that the public is absolutely and irrevocably opposed to the course Tory members want to take.

And these older, right wing affluent people go and vote. They will turn out in vast numbers on Thursday if they haven’t already voted by post. This is all the more reason to make sure that we have a huge turnout amongst young people and get them voting for us. So if you haven’t taken polling day off, see if you can change your plans and go and get out the vote.

 

* Caron Lindsay is Editor of Liberal Democrat Voice and blogs at Caron's Musings

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21 Comments

  • Richard Underhill 21st May '19 - 12:48pm

    Political commentators on the BBC are still saying that the next Tory leader will be Prime Minister. If they believe in anything they should believe in the Uncertainty Principle.
    The general election in 2017 did not provide an overall majority for the Tories.
    Since then three Tory MPs have joined Change UK (The Independent Group) and other respected Tory MPs have distanced themselves publicly without joining another party.
    Thursday provides another opportunity in the Commons to move a vote of no confidence.

  • “Two thirds of Tory members want a no deal Brexit so voting Lib Dem to stop Brexit on Thursday is more important than ever”.

    If that’s the case, Caron, why on earth did we ever go into Coalition with them and give them the oxygen of government which led to all this fiasco ?

    It should be carved on every Lib Dem heart – ‘Never give the Tories the time of day – and if you ride on a tiger prepare to be eaten’.

  • chris moore 21st May '19 - 1:48pm

    @David Raw 21st May ’19 – 1:05pm
    “Two thirds of Tory members want a no deal Brexit so voting Lib Dem to stop Brexit on Thursday is more important than ever”.
    If that’s the case, Caron, why on earth did we ever go into Coalition with them and give them the oxygen of government which led to all this fiasco ?

    The Tory membership has changed considerably since 2010 and overall, since the Referendum, become much more radical in its attitude to Europe, in line with all Leave voters.

    Satisfying to blame it on the Lib Dems though.

  • Richard O'Neill 21st May '19 - 3:12pm

    I am concerned how populist the party’s message has become, it verges on the downright misleading. It makes promises that can’t necessary be kept. A vote for Lib Dems on Thursday will not stop Brexit as promised in the leaflet I have received. The Lib Dems could win every single one of the European Parliament seats up-for-grabs and still not stop Brexit. At best it can send a signal to the party who might be able to stop Brexit, Labour.

    And to brand Labour as a pro-Brexit party (its more of a strained coalition with an ambiguous message) while insisting that this is effectively a second referendum is courting problems. It’s entirely possible that come the results the combined vote of UKIP, Tory, Labour and Brexit will be more than 50% (admittedly on a much lower turnout than General elections or the Referendum) and will be used as evidence that the public supports Brexit.

    Everything seems so short-term and obsessed about maximising the vote in this election.

  • David Becket 21st May '19 - 3:28pm

    We made many mistakes, our MPs should have controlled Clegg, but we gave stable government, that has not been seen since. The lesson is how should the smallest partner in a coalition conduct themselves?

  • chris moore 21st May ’19 – 1:48pm……………………..The Tory membership has changed considerably since 2010 and overall, since the Referendum, become much more radical in its attitude to Europe, in line with all Leave voters……………….

    I’m sorry but that is a complete rewrite of history.

    Cameron, worried by his Eurosceptic members, promised a referendum on the Lisbon treaty prior to 2010. in early 2012 the Eurosceptic group in the Conservative party had grown so vociferous that Cameron/Hague privately agreed to a referendum to appease them (and stop any defections to UKip). In Jan 2013 he was forced to go public with a promise to hold the referendum if the Tories won in 2015.
    Those, in the Tory party, wanting ‘out’ of the EU, were there in, and before, 2010 and have not changed their spots.

  • Richard O Neill: maximising the vote has to be the priority. This is politics and that means creating the impression of success. That is what it is all about. Success breeds success. The messages are simple and concise, well understood by most – people do not want loads of waffle. 7% or 15% on Sunday evening, I know which I prefer.

  • nigel hunter 21st May '19 - 4:31pm

    You Gov polls seem to be advertised a lot on the media including here.
    As it was founded by Zahawi and Shakespeare both Tories ,one an MP.you could argue that it is biased. It can therefore put them in a good light for Tory results and also give a hint to what the Tories want. The more publicity it gets ,for them the better for it keeps them in the media and therefore voters minds.

  • Richard Underhill 21st May '19 - 5:09pm

    Imagine being a journalist at Theresa May’s press conference. It really does not matter which questions you ask, the answers only include what you already know. Then imagine you are second or third in the queue, the same questions, the same answers. Then imagine you are an MP at PMQ. The question you really want to ask has already been asked, several times and answered several times in the same way.
    Is it any surprise that many MPs do not bother to go?

  • Thing is though, it’s being reported that Donald Tusk is telling people that they should vote Change UK to stop BREXIT… maybe he’s still annoyed with Nick Clegg calling for an in / out referendum 10 years ago?

  • Richard O'Neill 21st May '19 - 9:45pm

    @Theakes.

    I understand the practical point you are making, but turning to UKIP-style populism is depressing.

    A major case against the Brexit vote in 2016 was the misleading simplicity of a statement written on the side of a bus. I would put it to you that stating a vote for Lib Dems on Thursday will stop Brexit is a statement that could be put right next to it.

    I’d also mention another Lib Dems pledge of not so long ago that was then found (once in govt) to be undeliverable. If Lib Dems promise to stop Brexit, then have to admit this pledge is actually pretty nuanced, it could provoke mistrust equal to the tuition fees debacle.

  • The Tory party has always been the party of reactionaries, for as long as I have been a voter. Cameron put some lipstick on the pig and Clegg and Co kissed it. I expect they thought call me Dave was a decent chap, much like themselves, after all they came from similar backgrounds. That was the problem, none of them had an inking of the problems Joe and Joette Soap face, they can’t empathise with them because they can’t envisage their reality. Our polticians bow to the chattarati of the bubble, their top issues are not ours, security, stability and an improving life are. Farage and co pander to this, find a dodgy poltician from Europe to support him, do they care he actually hates gays, (rather than possibly thinks gay sex might be sinful, but that’s your choice), nope they don’t look at the headlines he attracts ( plus it might get the gay bashers on side). Farage thrives on hate and mistrust, meanwhile we pussy foot around pointing fingers at each other trying to be nice and not offend, just incase the chattarti point out people may hold un PC thoughts ( by the way, we all do because we are human not angels).

  • The Tories are what they have always been. They havn’t changed, just because call me Dave blagged some people, who should have known better that they had, doesn’t make it so. Learn from the mistake, or you’ll repeat it.

  • Matthew Huntbach 22nd May '19 - 1:30pm

    Richard O’Neill

    A major case against the Brexit vote in 2016 was the misleading simplicity of a statement written on the side of a bus.

    Yes, if Brexit was just the simple and easy thing the Brexiteers claimed, then they should have just voted for the Brexit agreement that the government came to. The fact that a large proportion of those who claim they support Brexit vote against every variation proposed indicates that it is NOT a simple yes/no thing. So, we need to push that: don’t blame us who never supported it in the first place for it not happening, blame those who did support it but refused to come to a compromise agreement.

    It most definitely was not the case that everyone who voted Leave in 2016 supported a no-deal Leave, indeed the sort of agreements that countries like Norway and Switzerland have were specifically mentioned to encourage those who had concerns about the consequences to support Leave.

    So, we need to push that a second referendum is needed because the Brexiteers themselves have proved it is not a simple yes/no thing, and now it has been looked into in detail, yes it does need the people of this country to come back and agree to the actual form it will take. Or to agree that as there is no one form all those who supported Brexit have been able to come up with and agree to, then we will instead just stay in.

  • Matthew Huntbach 22nd May '19 - 1:47pm

    Richard O’Neill

    I’d also mention another Lib Dems pledge of not so long ago that was then found (once in govt) to be undeliverable. If Lib Dems promise to stop Brexit, then have to admit this pledge is actually pretty nuanced, it could provoke mistrust equal to the tuition fees debacle.

    Yes, we need to make clear that politics is not just a yes/no thing. It often does mean having to agree to a compromise that is not your ideal because you can’t get a majority to agree to your ideal.

    We need to make clear that is what a coalition is about. If there isn’t one, then government is a mess because there is no majority to agree to everything, so nothing gets done.

    The coalition formed in 2010 was the only viable government, given that due to the disproportional representation electoral system supported by Labour there weren’t enough Labour and LibDems MPs to form a Labour-LibDem coalition. The electoral system also meant there were five times as many Conservative MPs as LibDem MPs, even though the Conservatives only got one and a half times as many votes.

    So why is it that people keep pushing the suggestion that the LibDems fully supported everything the Coalition did? Do they suppose that with just one-sixth of its MPs, the LibDems could get the Conservatives to drop all their own policies and pick up 100% LibDem ones? No, what they really want is to make that false accusation in order to destroy the LibDems, so the Tories can be boosted and take over complete control with Labour as the cozy sole opposition party.

    On tuition fees, could the LibDems get the Conservatives to drop their main policy of keeping tax low in order to keep up university funding? No – so the only way it could have been done would have been even bigger cuts elsewhere to pay for it. Will those who moan at us about tuition fees say that would have been better? Or massive cuts to universities to make paying for them cost less? Better? Please tell us, you who moan at us.

  • Matthew Huntbach 22nd May '19 - 2:01pm

    frankie

    The Tory party has always been the party of reactionaries, for as long as I have been a voter.

    No, I don’t think so. The Conservatives ever since they took over government in 1979 have been about massive change in the way the country is. They have been all about pushing things so that modern business takes control and government direct control of so many things disappears with privatisation.

    Oh sure, many of those who vote Conservative are reactionaries, and the Conservatives like to pretend that’s what they’re like to get those votes. But that’s a marvellous way of winning, if you can get away with it. Claim you are the party of one thing to get support for that, while in reality causing the opposite to happen. It’s a bit like selling a medicine you say helps cure a problem when actually that medicine causes that problem – you can then sell it very well because people are buying it to cure what it is actually causing.

  • chris moore 22nd May '19 - 3:22pm

    David Raw 21st May ’19 – 2:48pm
    @Chris Moore No satisfaction whatsoever – simply a cautionary tale. Calling a spade a spade instead of pretending it’s a self-justifying bucket. Read, digest and learn is the suggestion.

    The Lib Dems are not responsable for the radicalisation in Tory membership.

  • chris moore 22nd May '19 - 3:28pm

    expats 21st May ’19 – 4:15pm
    chris moore 21st May ’19 – 1:48pm……………………..The Tory membership has changed considerably since 2010 and overall, since the Referendum, become much more radical in its attitude to Europe, in line with all Leave voters……………….

    You say, expats, “I’m sorry but that is a complete rewrite of history.
    Cameron, worried by his Eurosceptic members, promised a referendum on the Lisbon treaty prior to 2010. in early 2012 the Eurosceptic group in the Conservative party had grown so vociferous that Cameron/Hague privately agreed to a referendum to appease them (and stop any defections to UKip). In Jan 2013 he was forced to go public with a promise to hold the referendum if the Tories won in 2015.
    Those, in the Tory party, wanting ‘out’ of the EU, were there in, and before, 2010 and have not changed their spots.”

    The Tory membership has become MORE leave-orientated since 2010 and more radical in its understanding of what leave means.

    All you have said above is that there were already Eurosceptics in the Tory party in 2010. No one’s saying otherwise.

    You say, ” in early 2012 the Eurosceptic group in the Conservative party had grown so vociferous that Cameron/Hague privately agreed to a referendum to appease them (and stop any defections to UKip). ”

    Here you are talking about the MPs. No one has said there were no Eurosceptic MPs in the Tory party.

  • Matthew,
    They wanted massive change but change to what? I believe the change they wanted was to the values of a previous age, in fact I’d be specific about the age they yearn for

    As an admirer of Victorian values, Mrs Thatcher often spoke in glowing terms of voluntarism and its links with enterprise and liberty. In an important speech to the Zurich Economic Society while in opposition in 1977, she told her audience that “the Victorian era — the heyday of free enterprise in Britain — was also the era of the rise of selflessness and benefaction”. And in a telling comment, she remarked that a “free society is morally better . . . because it entails dispersal of power away from the center to a multitude of smaller groups and individuals”. Collectivism, on the other hand, concentrated power “in the hands of the state at the centre”, which reminded her of Lord Acton’s dictum about the corruption of power. [The Collected Speeches of Margaret Thatcher, ed. Robin Harris ((London, 1997), pp. 53-4].

    http://www.socialaffairsunit.org.uk/blog/archives/000294.php

    Conservatives wish to keep things as they are, the present lot seem to want a glourious past and they’ve been trying to get us back there for a very long time. They are Reactionary in their nature and to be fair that chimes with a large percentage of the old and a not incinsidrable number of the disposed, who crave the stability of the past. The problem you have is you can’t turn back time, coupled with the fact the Victorian age wasn’t glourious for the plebs it was bloody nasty.

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