Author Archives: Lucy Johnson

More young people should work in politics – my story

On Thursday 20th September I started my nine-month internship with the office of Tim Farron MP and the Westmorland and Lonsdale Liberal Democrats.

Less than a month before this, I was sitting in my University library worrying not only about completing my Master’s dissertation, but also about the fact that I didn’t have any form of employment lined up.

I never would have thought that within a matter of weeks I would have moved up to the Lake District and secured the perfect role working for a political organisation which I am passionate about.

Each day working for the Liberal Democrats is different. Sometimes I will be in the office doing tasks such as emailing, folding, printing, stuffing of envelopes, ringing, as well as other general admin duties included in my role.

As well as this, I also spend quite a bit of time out in the constituency doing jobs such as delivering, surveying and canvassing. The fact that the job allows me to spend time in both the office and on the doorstep, is one of the best things about the role.

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged and | 2 Comments

My Grandad – A tribute to Liberal Party president Lord Evans of Claughton

Growing up, the subject of politics was often on the agenda at family gatherings. However, it was not until I was older that I realised how important and influential my Grandad was within the political arena.

Gruff Evans was brought up in a Welsh-speaking family who resided in Birkenhead on the Wirral. Despite being offered a place at Oxford University, he chose to study law at Liverpool University where he graduated in 1948. After completing National Service as a pilot officer in the Royal Air Force, he established a solicitor’s practice in Liverpool.

Both Gruff’s parents supported the Liberal Party, however they were notoriously divided as his mother was an ‘Asquithian’ Liberal, while his father was a supporter of Lloyd-George. Gruff upheld this Liberal tradition, and to the surprise of the local Tory party, he successfully gained a seat on Birkenhead County Council in 1957 which he subsequently held for twelve years. He then went on to win a seat on Wirral Borough Council in 1973 and led the Liberal Group from 1977 to 1981. Unfortunately, Gruff was less successful in national politics, failing to win at seat in the House of Commons (see here, pg. 22, for more information).

My Grandfather was prominent in the Liberal Party from the 1950s through to the early 1990s. He worked his way up the party ranks, from Chair of the National League of Young Liberals 1960-61, to Chairman of the party’s National Executive, Assembly Committee, and General Election Committee, to attaining the Presidency of the Liberal Party in 1977. During his time as President, Gruff had to confront the controversy surrounding the former leader Jeremy Thorpe which unintentionally brought him into the media spotlight and he subsequently found himself being a familiar figure in the national news during the week of the Liberal Party annual conference.

Posted in Liberal History and Op-eds | Tagged , and | 12 Comments
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  • User AvatarJohn Marriott 11th Nov - 10:19pm
    Some lines do not scan well. For example, instead of “Demonstrate the strength of the British/Backing all MPs doing right”, why not “Showing the strength...
  • User AvatarKeith Browning 11th Nov - 9:43pm
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  • User AvatarTony Greaves 11th Nov - 7:59pm
    As I say, Caron, good luck with your efforts.
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    @Mick Taylor @7pm Seconded
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    Richard Underhill. You may be right but it doesn't invalidate my point. If leaders showed more concern about peace and less about their own status/machismo,...
  • User AvatarRuth Bright 11th Nov - 6:24pm
    It was touching to see Jo at the cenotaph because she so visibly represented a different generation.