Author Archives: Stephen Tall

Stephen was Editor (and Co-Editor) of Liberal Democrat Voice from 2007 to 2015, and writes at The Collected Stephen Tall. He writes a fortnightly column for ConservativeHome and 'The Underdog' column for Total Politics magazine. He edited the 2013 publication, The Coalition and Beyond: Liberal Reforms for the Decade Ahead, and is a Research Associate for the liberal think-tank CentreForum. He was awarded the inaugural Lib Dem ‘Blogger of the Year’ prize in 2006, was a councillor for eight years in Oxford, including a year as Deputy Lord Mayor, and appears frequently in the media in person, in print and online. Stephen combines his political interests with his professional life as Development Director for the Education Endowment Foundation, though writes here in a personal capacity.

LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 24

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 19

Congratulations to erstwhile LDV day editor Mark Valladares, whose modestly titled Creeting Gentry FC (1,128 points) start 2016 in pole position in the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 19. It’s a fiercely contested position, though — just 37 points separate the top 10.

But let’s also hear it for three players outside the top 10, who were the highest scoring managers in December: Michael Brown’s Mike’s Dream Team v5 (372), Benjamin Andrew’s Pleased to Beat-chu (363) and Steven Garrett Thirteen striders (362).

ldv ffl 19

There are 219 players in total and …

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 16

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 14

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Stephen Tall’s diary: liberal jottings on the week’s big events

Honest doubt

I wrote on Syria last week that I was “mystified by those who’ve already made their minds up with cast-iron certainty on either side”. That’s still the case despite, and probably because of, the eruption of passions leading up to and beyond Wednesday’s vote. The UK is, after all, already involved in military action against Isis in Iraq. Sure, extending those airstrikes to Syria represents an intensification and, like any bombing campaign, requires serious consideration. But that is a question not of basic morality (if it were there should have been an equally strenuous efforts to cease attacks in Iraq) but of likely effectiveness.

And that, of course, is the known unknown of this week’s debate. None of us truthfully knows what will be the consequences of extending the campaign to Syria; just as we don’t know what might have happened if MPs had voted against action. There is no possibility of a controlled experiment which allows us to pose the counterfactual. All we are left with is our own opinion: which of the options facing us is most likely to result in fewest deaths? Ultimately, it’s as utilitarian a decision as that.

Which is why I get fed up with simplistic shroud-wavers shouting “blood on your hands” at those who support intervention. Innocent people are dying every day in this conflict, and further deaths are plotted daily by Isis, so delaying further this supposed “rush to war” will also directly lead to fresh casualties. See, we can all indulge this moral blackmail arms-race — but it gets us nowhere. Decisions like these are shades-of-grey. I respect opinions on both sides of the divide on Syria, but most especially those honest enough to recognise they may be wrong.

The worm’s turned

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 13

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Stephen Tall’s Diary: liberal jottings on the week’s big events

Spending Revue Reviewed

‘You make your own luck,’ goes the saying. In which case, and only in this respect, George Osborne truly has started a “march of the makers” because he’s one hell of a lucky Chancellor. Had the independent Office for Budget Responsibility not lavished on him a £27 billion fiscal (and notional) windfall, this week’s Autumn Statement would have been far more wintry. As it was, he was able to play out the role of Santa, albeit a very Tory version: snatching away fewer of the kids’ presents in order to re-gift them to their grandparents. For this was a spending review which confirmed this Government stands shoulder-to-shoulder with pensioners (who vote, in droves) while shrugging its shoulders at the plight of the younger, working poor (who often don’t vote, and if they do probably vote Labour anyway).

Yes, the tax credit cuts were jettisoned for now — take a bow all those who’ve campaigned against them because it took concerted action to persuade the House of Lords and a few Tory MPs with a social conscience to stand up to this government — but, really, they’ve just been deferred. Once universal credit has been implemented (assuming that Godot-like day ever arises) the Resolution Foundation calculates eligible working families with children will be £1,300 a year worse off (even taking into account the so-called ‘national living wage’ and planned increases in the tax-threshold). Which might sound bad, but that average actually conceals far worse news for some. For instance, a single mum working part-time on the minimum wage will receive £2,800 a year less by 2020 under the Tories’ plans, while a working couple on the minimum wage with three kids will lose out to the tune of £3,060. Meanwhile the pensions ‘triple lock’ (of which Lib Dems have often boasted) will guarantee that pensioner benefits grow to more than half of all welfare spending.

Gone are the days when the Lib Dems could require a distributional analysis to ensure the pain of cuts was shared around to ensure that, as far as possible, Britain was all in it together. It’s George’s Show now. It’s just a shame some of his luck won’t rub off on those “hard-working families” he’s soon going to clobber.

Rational actors

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Stephen Tall’s Diary: liberal jottings on the week’s big events

Labour pains

“Ten-word answers can kill you in political campaigns.” So said every liberal’s fantasy US president, Jed Bartlett – surely someone in Team Corbyn is a West Wing fan? Clearly not, or they might have advised the Labour leader not to think-out-loud in TV interviews this past week, especially when the thoughts which frothed forth were so, well, thoughtless. Of course it would have been “far better” if Mohammed Emwazi (“Jihadi John”) had been tried in a court of law. It’s just that the absence of an extradition treaty with Isis makes that a bit of a challenge (unless Jezza’s up for a bit of cheeky rendition). And of course no-one is “happy” with the idea of a shoot-to-kill policy being operated by the UK police or security services — but, then, that isn’t the actual policy.

What the last week has revealed is that Corbyn is incapable of moving beyond the glib agitprop sloganeering of hard-left oppositionalism. That’s probably not surprising after 32 years as a backbencher never having (or wanting) to take responsibility for a tough decision. But it remains disastrous for the Labour party, which needs a plausible prime minister as its leader, and disastrous for the country, which needs a plausible alternative government. I’ll confess a sliver of me is enjoying the schadenfreude of watching Labour self-immolate as a result of the self-indulgent stupidity of its membership in handing the leadership to someone painfully obviously unfit for the office. But the responsible part of me knows that, for all our sakes, Labour needs to get real again, and quickly.

Time for Tim

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Liberal jottings: Stephen Tall’s weekly notebook

Status Quo’s winning record

Painful though it might be for liberals to admit the fact, Britain is a fundamentally conservative country. Opposition is more often expressed with a tut or a sceptically-arched eyebrow than a revolution. And then things generally revert to how they were before. Which is why, though I’m more careful these days about predicting what will happen next in British politics, I remain sure ‘remain’ will win the EU referendum.

A few years ago, after our AV knock-back, I looked back at the history of referendums in this country (starting with the first ever UK plebiscite, the 1973 Northern Ireland sovereignty referendum). Doing so, I formulated what I’m going to call Tall’s Law in the hope it catches on (though Tall’s Rule of Thumb would be more accurate): “the public will vote for the status quo when asked in a referendum except when the change proposed in a referendum is backed by a coalition of most/all the major parties”. Come the EU referendum, we will see the Conservatives and Labour (to one degree or another) as well as the Lib Dems united in favour of Britain’s continuing EU membership. Sure, take nothing for granted — but a defeat for ‘remain’ would be an unprecedented occurrence. And precedent is a very British custom, for better and worse.

Burnham down

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 11

No change at the top of the leaderboard, with Paul Revell’s Sock Monsters (667 points) continuing to lead the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 11. Not far behind are Christopher Buck’s Moves Like Agger (637) and Simon Stokes’ Back of the Net (629).

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Liberal jottings: Stephen Tall’s weekly notebook

Blind chance

Here’s a paradox I’ve often pondered – why are so many Lib Dems who support name-blind job applications against external assessment of children in schools? What’s the link, I hear you ask. Okay, let me explain… Lynne Featherstone did a great job over many years highlighting the need for applicants’ names not to be disclosed on job applications to avoid employers’ bias (inadvertent or otherwise) against individuals, especially those whose gender and, in particular, race is evident from their name. There’s a stack of evidence demonstrating that equally qualified candidates are less likely to get called for interview if, for example, they have a non-white-sounding name. Increasingly, companies are going further, introducing ‘CV blind’ methods so that applicants are interviewed by panels who know nothing about their educational backgrounds. Of course, none of this is a guarantee against discrimination – after all, race and gender cannot be hidden at interview – but it does get closer to eliminating bias, conscious or unconscious. A good thing, yes?

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 10

No change in this week’s top 3, with Paul Revell’s Sock Monsters (590 points) continuing to lead the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 10, just ahead of Christopher Buck’s Moves Like Agger (570) and Edward Douglas’s Use Your Ed (568).

But let’s also hear it for three players outside the top 10: Robbie Cowbury’s Resplendent Quetzals had the best week’s performance, with 83 points. Honourable mentions go to Areef Dullabh’s Mantastic Utd and Andrew Hollyer’s West Tottpool Utd, with 79 and 72 points respectively.

ldv ffl 10

There are 220 players …

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Liberal jottings: Stephen Tall’s weekly notebook

Good Lords above

We live in a topsy turvy world. Following their defeat on tax credits, the Conservatives, who kaiboshed reform in the last parliament, are now urgently reviewing the powers of the House of Lords. Meanwhile Labour, which chose to abstain on a Lib Dem motion stopping the cuts, is promising to support the Tories if they now stop them.

Ah, but aren’t the Lib Dems at least as hypocritical? runs the argument of the unthinking right. The party wants to abolish the Lords yet our peers are “on the warpath”. Let’s leave to one side, for just a moment, that the Conservatives explicitly ruled out making these cuts before the election. Let’s also leave to one side that the Conservatives deliberately chose to avoid a vote on tax credits in the elected Commons… The simple point remains: the Lib Dems participate fully in the Lords because we work for democratic reform within the existing structures. It’s why we continue to stand for election to the Commons even though we think first-past-the-post is a rotten system. I guess it’s also why Ukip stand for election to the European Parliament even though they don’t think it should exist — though oddly you hear a lot less of this alleged hypocrisy from the unthinking right.

Careless Talk Talk

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 9

Congratulations to Paul Revell, whose ‘Sock Monsters’ (536 points) have re-gained the lead in the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 9, just ahead of Christopher Buck’s ‘Moves Like Agger’ (530) and Edward Douglas’s ‘Use Your Ed’ (520).

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Liberal jottings: Stephen Tall’s weekly notebook

Heidi Hi

The maiden speech of Heidi Allen MP, Tory successor to Andrew Lansley in South Cambridgeshire, received acclaim this week for its outspoken attack on her party’s plans to slash tax credits for 13 million households.

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Thank you! 9,727 reasons getting naked on TV was well worth it

st runAs my LibDemVoice colleagues have been kind enough to highlight, I fulfilled my pledge* this week to run naked down Whitehall. My daft fault for claiming on live telly that’s what I’d do if the Lib Dems were reduced to 24 MPs. Never bet more than you can afford to lose, folks.

In any case, it was all in a good cause. I wasn’t going to go through with it for the lolz. But when Kelvin McKenzie challenged me on the Daily Politics — and said he’d back up the offer with £5,000 to the charity of my choice — I didn’t have to think twice. (My main regret now is I didn’t dare him to double it: as a professional fundraiser, I should know better than to accept the first offer made…)

I wanted the money to go to a charity working on the current refugee crisis. Having done a little research, I decided on Médecins Sans Frontières, aka Doctors Without Borders, a humanitarian medical aid organisation providing medical aid where it is most needed, regardless of race, religion, politics or gender.

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 8

Sergio Agüero’s haul of five goals finally rewarded those of us who’d stuck with him through his goal drought — and brought about a big change in our LDV Top 10. Congratulations to Christopher Buck, whose Moves Like Agger (476 points) lead the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 8, just ahead of Paul Revell’s Sock Monsters (459) and Edward Douglas’s Use Your Ed (451).

Edward and Christopher has the week’s best performances. But let’s also hear it for two players outside the top 10: William Jones’ Slumdog Mignolet accumulated 112 points, as did Callum Morton’s RRN’s.

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 7

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 6

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 5

Yes, I know it’s Lib Dem conference week – but don’t let that distract you from your essential fantasy football team management responsibilities…

Congratulations to Lee Medlicott, whose Disco’s Dopughnuts lead the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 5 with an impressive haul of 297 points – that puts him at 1,110th in the global league of 3.4 million players! Lee’s just ahead of Paul Revell’s Sock Monsters and Joe Harris’s Fer-Fer-2.

Lee’s performance was the best in Gameweek 5 (75 points). But let’s also hear it for three players outside the top 10: Alain Desmier’s Highbury Hill Heroes, with 74 points, and honourable mentions go to Rich Chapelle and Alan Worthington, both with 69 points.

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 2

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How to enter the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League

LDV FANTASY FOOTBALLThe English Premier League kicks off this Saturday and LibDemVoice has revived its Fantasy Football League to mark the occasion. So if you fancy pitting your soccer selection skills against fellow party members, here’s your chance.

To enter all you have to do is click on this link. Simply register your details, pick your team, and away you go. If you need the joining code at any point, it’s 271576-231936.

And for those who don’t feel they have the insider knowledge to compete, you can always choose the ‘auto-complete’ option …

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How to enter the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League 2015/16

LDV FANTASY FOOTBALLThe English Premier League kicks off a week today, on Saturday 8th August, and LibDemVoice has revived its Fantasy Football League to mark the occasion.

So if you fancy pitting your soccer selection skills against fellow party members — and try and knock the 2014/15 champion George Murray off his perch — then here’s your chance.

To enter all you have to do is click on this link. Simply register your details, pick your team, and away you go. If you need the joining code at any point, it’s 271576-231936.

And for those who don’t feel they have the insider knowledge to compete, you can always choose the ‘auto-complete’ option so your team is picked for you – just imagine how smug you’ll then feel when you beat those of us who’ve slaved over our choices…

Good luck to all those who take part.

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: the final table

Today marks the traditional climax to the English football season, the FA Cup Final. It also brings to a close this season’s LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League.

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 36

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 34

Congratulations to George Murray, whose Marauding Fullbacks (2,064 points) continue to top the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 34, almost 100 points ahead of Jon Featonby’s What bitey racist (1,966)? They think it’s all over…

But let’s also hear it for three players outside the top 10: Robbie Cowbury’s Resplendent Quetzals had the best week’s performance, with 88 points. Honourable mentions go to Louis Urruty’s Louis’ XI and Henry Compson’s Status:Relegated, both with 86 points.

LDV FANTASY FOOTBALL 34

There are 163 players in total and you can still join the league …

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 33

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 32

Congratulations to George Murray, whose Marauding Fullbacks again top the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 32, with 1,925 points. Meanwhile, Jon Featonby (1,856), Mark Widdop (1,829), Sam Bowman (1,827) and Edward Douglas (1,826) vie for the number two slot.

But let’s also hear it for the two who achieved the best week’s performances: Kye Dorricott’s Chip Bang Utd (84 points) and Jamie Saddler’s Scotland In Disguise (81).

Here’s the top 10:

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 31

Congratulations to George Murray, still topping the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 31

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LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League: how it stands after Week 30

Congratulations to George Murray, whose Marauding Fullbacks lead the LibDemVoice Fantasy Football League after Week 30

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