Tag Archives: federal committee reports

Federal Policy Committee Report – 11 May 2016

The Federal Policy Committee had its most recent meeting on 11th May 2016. The agenda was a fairly light one with two major substantive items.

Further Discussion on Liberty and Security Working Group Paper

Brian Paddick attended the committee again to discuss the progress of this working group. It is nearing its closing stages now and will report to conference in the Autumn.

The group has consulted very widely throughout the party; firstly at a consultation session at Spring Conference which was extremely well attended, secondly, through an online survey that was promoted on Twitter and Facebook, thereby doubling the number of responses, and finally through actively soliciting submissions from various groups within the party.

There was a short paper presented to the committee setting out various provisional conclusions that had been reached and that formed a basis for discussion.

The areas that are to be addressed in the paper will follow the remit that was set. Those areas include the range and severity of the threats to the country arising from terrorism, extremism and cross-border crime, the necessary powers of the police and security services in order to deal with those threats, online surveillance by the authorities, the regulation and accountability of the police, the encroachment on individual liberty by entities other than government such as private companies and news media and, finally, the steps that government can take to reduce threats to public safety other than through the police and security services.

It would not be right for me to go into the conclusions of the group now and before the release of the final paper. That said, the paper will cover issues such as the current threat level facing the United Kingdom and the sources from which that threat is derived, the Investigatory Powers Bill and its predecessors, secret courts, the PREVENT strategy and potential changes to it, data collection by private companies, the stripping of citizenship and the potential for someone to be left stateless, covert human surveillance, the Digital Bill of Rights, data protection, trust in the police and the effect of government foreign policy on community relations and perception.

There was a range of comments from members of the committee. There was an extremely interesting discussion about bulk data collection, dark areas of the net and social media and the ability of the security services to access that material and those areas. There were also comments about PREVENT and CHANNEL, Secret Courts and a new requirement to prove nationality if a person is stopped that the government has imposed.

The final paper will return to the Federal Policy Committee on 8th June 2016.

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | Leave a comment
Advert



Recent Comments

  • User AvatarMartin Land 6th Dec - 11:40pm
    @Tony Greaves. What do you expect with our best campaigner in long-term exile?
  • User AvatarJoseph Bourke 6th Dec - 11:13pm
    Peter. Roche in his blog goes on to say "My critique of MMT has nothing to do with them dropping or adding (X-M). In MMT...
  • User AvatarPeter Martin 6th Dec - 11:01pm
    @ Michael BG The 4% is the surplus of the overseas sector which is a deficit from the UK's perspective. The Government and PDS are...
  • User Avatarnigel hunter 6th Dec - 10:58pm
    Make our own media (paper) and put it thru the letter box. YES! Say quarterly stating LIBDEM news and advertising our policies etc. YES, I...
  • User AvatarManfarang 6th Dec - 10:32pm
    The fact that there has been whinging about our campaign newspapers shows the Liberal Democrats are having some success. Create and print then put them...
  • User Avatarfrankie 6th Dec - 10:27pm
    The reply Mark should say is " Wots it worth". When the media come looking for a story be picky who you choose, BBC turn...
Tue 10th Dec 2019