Tag Archives: LDV at 10

LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: The one with the naked man

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

This is one of our more iconic posts. Former co-editor Stephen Tall made a bit of a rash promise on the Daily Politics in 2013. He said that if the Liberal Democrats only  won 24 seats in the General Election, he would run naked up Whitehall.

Well, sadly, the election result is history. Stephen could have got off on a technicality, but he did the run, on, of all dates, the anniversary of Margaret Thatcher’s birth, pretty much naked and filmed for the Daily Politics. Enjoy.

Stephen Tall, formerly of this parish, has honoured the pledge he made to run naked down Whitehall if the Liberal Democrats were reduced to 24 seats.

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LDV is 10 years old today!

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: What we said when the Coalition was born

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

Cast your minds back to May 2010, when Nick Clegg walked along Downing Street as Deputy PM for the first time. How did LDV contributors take the news?

101 ways to win an election co-author Ed Maxfield described family tensions but looked at the opportunities the coalition offered. His comments about the way we campaign should probably have been more widely read:

Those entering government face an enormous responsibility – to deliver good government with a distinct liberal tone. But the wider party must also recognise this is potentially a moment of transformation. We have to start work now on winning the referendum on voting reform. We have to plan for the next election to be on radically different boundaries returning far fewer MPs (and on AV too). Hardest of all, perhaps, we have to ask whether the guerilla campaigning techniques that have served us so well for the last 40 years are ‘fit for purpose’ now.

I am unsettled but full of hope for the future today. Being in government is much harder than being in opposition.

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: The one with the Games Makers

gamesmakers

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

Continuing our Olympic themed weekend, four years ago, our Mary Reid spent two weeks as a Games Maker at the Paralympics. She wrote about her experiences and asked what the Liberal Democrats could learn from that.

Certainly, there has been more of an effort to engage and appreciate our volunteers at a national level since then, but there is always scope for improvement.

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: Looking back at London 2012

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

While we are all marvelling at the Olympic action in Rio, there is no way that the Games pack as big an emotional punch for British people as our home games four years ago. Even the most hard-hearted sceptic got totally caught up in the Games.

With all that’s happened since, many of us want to see that tolerant, inclusive, liberal vision set out in Danny Boyle’s amazing opening ceremony.  That Britain is still very much there, despite what has happened recently. Building that country that works for everyone is the only way to bring people back from listening to the voices of those who spread hatred and division.

Anyway, here is Stephen Tall’s take on Boyle’s opening ceremony. He made Danny Boyle his Liberal Hero of the Week.

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: The one where Vince said what we needed to do about the credit crunch

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

Let’s go back to 2008 and the start of the global crash.

Here is what Vince Cable had to say. It’s relevant because it shows our consistency of approach to these things over the years and that we were well ahead of the game in predicting the dangers of the accumulation of personal debt.

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: The one where Labour thought vegetarians could be terrorists

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

Just in case you ever forget how awful Labour could be on civil liberties. With added video from Dr Pack.

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: The one with Joanna Lumley and the Gurkhas

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

Remember that wonderful day in 2009 when a Liberal Democrat motion to allow Gurkhas to settle in this country was won and the Labour Government was defeated.  Joanna Lumley had been at the forefront of the campaign and she and Nick Clegg and David Cameorn held a press conference after the vote.

The next week, Joanna Lunley had some robust exchanges with then Labour MP Phil Woolas ( remember him?).

It’s a huge pity that David Cameron seemed to forget this when he let down the Afghan interpreters who served our country and put themselves and their families at huge risk.

Anyway, here’s Alex Foster’s post rounding up the commentary on that historic day before the result of the vote was known.

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: The dawn of Cleggmania

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

April 15th 2010 is an auspicious date in Liberal Democrat history. It was the first Leaders’ Debate in a General Election at UK level ever.

Nick Clegg was adjudged the winner. Here’s Stephen Tall’s commentary on the night itself.

Within a few days, the world would have gone mad with Cleggmania. Given what’s happening in politics now, it seems tame but it was a Big Thing at the time. You knew it wasn’t really going to lead to anything, but it was a good feeling. 1983, when the Alliance was at one point ahead in the polls and finished with just 23 MPs always loomed large in my mind.  Anyway, over to Stephen:

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: On the Election that never was

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

As the party gears up for a potential snap election called by a Prime Minister on honeymoon, we can look back at the last time we thought, with a bit more certainty, that we were in this boat. I kid you not, one candidate actually cancelled a holiday to China because he didn’t want to be away for any of the campaign.

Of course, then, it never happened. Here is Stephen Tall’s analysis of the situation:

100 days in power, and the toughest decision yet faces the Prime Minister: does he seek a mandate, or does he delay calling an election?

A week ago, the decision looked a formality. Labour was riding high in the polls on the back of their ‘nobody mention the Blairs’ party conference, and a couple of polls suggesting double-digit leads over the Tories. Spool forward, and it’s all looking a lot less rosy, with a slew of polls indicating a narrowing of Labour’s lead.

If there’s one thing more stupid than taking too much notice of opinion polls, it’s taking no notice of them. You can bet the last penny in your Northern Rock account that Mr Brown and his advisors will be poring over every single psephological detail.

If – and it remains a big if – Mr Brown decides it’s too risky, and rules out a November election, he leaves a wide open door for the Lib Dems and the Tories: the carefully cultured image of a strong Prime Minister in complete control of events will be impossible to maintain after weeks of dithering culminating in a conclusion that he’s not popular enough to win, even with the following wind of a 100-day honeymoon.

It’s not only his prestige with the public and the media which will take a knocking – so too will his credibility among the party faithful, who have so far shown themselves to be devotedly in thrall to Mr Brown. He’ll have marched them up to the top of the hill, only for them to discover he forgot to mention there’s another peak beyond. Pretty demoralising stuff. The Labour party has trusted their leader to know exactly what he’s doing. That Mr Brown’s now boxed himself into a corner suggests he’s not the political genius too many people have assumed on the basis of not much evidence.

Of course, he may well still call an election for November. Until now, I’ve thought Labour would be sure-fire winners of such a snap poll. Not any more. Mr Brown is obsessed, it seems, with trying to understand the British psyche – in which case he should appreciate the very real possibility that the public could react in a ‘bloody sod yer then’ way to any cynical attempt to bounce them into casting their votes before they’re good and ready.

If there’s one lesson of the last three weeks’ opinion polls it is that the public has still to make up its mind about any of the parties, and wants to see all their leaders properly tested in the coming months. Force-feeding voters a diet of under-cooked policies in a rushed general election will just give everyone indigestion.

But what of now? I expect Lynton Crosby is champing at the bit to persuade Theresa May to go to the country. She has the chance to kill her opposition. I hear that senior Labour people at Westminster are pretty gloomy with some even thinking that they would be lucky to win 100 seats. The Tories are ahead in the polls and we’re in that Brexit phony war situation. The economy is likely to take a major knock. Things are going to get bad. If you were Theresa May, would you not want to secure yourself another five years before things get terrible?

Posted in From the LDV Archive | 5 Comments

LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: All about Facebook

Fake Norman Lamb Facebook group screenshotOn 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

LDV was actually set up before Facebook became a thing. Or at least before it became a thing outside universities.

The first mention I can find came back in February 2007 when Mark Pack spied Liberal Democrat MPs flocking to the New Big Thing.

There’s been a flurry of Liberal Democrat MPs starting to use the social networking site Facebook in the last few weeks – including party leader Ming Campbell (the first UK party leader to do so, just as he was the first on Google Video and YouTube), Jo SwinsonSteve WebbStephen Williams and Lynne Featherstone.

Facebook used to only be open to students – and so there is a strong Lib Dem Youth and Student presence on it – but has recently been opened up to anyone.

If you are a Facebook user yourself or you become one after reading this post and wondering what on earth it is all about, don’t forget to join the Liberal Democrat group (currently 561 members, rather more than Labour’s 490).

Five months later, Mark charted how the parties were using Facebook in parliamentary by-elections, complete with 3D bar charts.

Facebook provided some early mysteries, such as the time someone set up a fake profile of Norman Lamb which mentioned his opponent more than you would expect.

The plot got very much thicker and Mark turned detective to try to unmask the culprit.

Amongst the Wikipedia edits is a plug for this anti-Liberal Democrat film which tries to pass itself off as an official pro-Liberal Democrat film (e.g. in the YouTube description: “Watch the video to find out why you should re-elect the Liberal Democrat run North Norfolk district council.” and the start of the film, which says it is “the Liberal Democrats broadcast for the local elections”).

The same username as that used on YouTube to upload the film – daisydukew – has also been used to make pro-Conservative comments elsewhere online: here and here.

d.The same IP address has also been used to make – deep breath – eleven different comments over four days on Liberal Democrat Voice claiming to be from seven different people (plus a couple of anonymous ones). .

It must be like Piccadilly Circus at that computer!

All of the names given are names that haven’t been used before to post on this site. One thing they all have in common is that where they try to place responsibility for the faking on anyone, it is always someone other than the Conservatives.

Then there was the final descent into farce.

Mark will probably kill me for unearthing this one, where he sings the praises of Lib Dem ACT. Remember that? I thought I’d give ACT the benefit of the doubt at the time but it seemed to be daft when everyone was on Facebook. Mark said:

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LDV at 10: Pick of the posts: The one with the dodgy crystal ball

On 27th August, LDV will be 10 years old. In that time, we’ve brought you over 24,000 posts and published over 337,000 comments. Over the Summer holidays, we’ll take you on a nostalgic meander through a decade of Liberal Democrat history, seen through the eyes of our editors and contributors. We hope you enjoy our choices.

LDV burst on to the scene on 27th August 2006 with a bold prediction about the forthcoming Party Presidential election. Incumbent Simon Hughes was “certain to be challenged.”

Word reaches the Voice that weeks before the position had been advertised in Lib Dem News, party officials in Cowley Street received a call requesting a copy of the nomination papers for party President – the caller was not acting on behalf of Simon Hughes.

Word also reaches us that one potential candidate is positioning himself to blitz Autumn Conference with an army of supporters bearing nomination papers, to seize the momentum.

A Presidential contest is no bad thing – though there is an argument that there are better ways to spend the money. The Voice has been told that a proposal is being put to the Federal Executive to double the campaign expenditure limit – to  £5000 per candidate.

So our crystal ball may have been a bit wonky.

It’s worth noting that our last prediction about a presidential election,  a members’ survey suggesting a Daisy Cooper win, was similarly affected by the LDV Presidential Curse.

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  • theakes
    Sorry working though the night has dislodged my date process, by elections of course tomorrow....
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    7 local by elections today, normally might think two or three in favourable territory, South and South West.....
  • nvelope2003
    Alex Macfie: Whenever I heard Lembit Opik speak he usually came across as rational and often very perceptive although I did not agree with everything he said. I...
  • Peter Martin
    The Lib Dems could yet overturn the Tory applecart. If so Sarah Green will show how to do it better than I've read anywhere on LDV. Lib Dems should forget ab...
  • theakes
    Yes but this is an "Internal poll" allegedly, not neutral! It might be right but it comes with a lot of caveats does it not?....