Author Archives: Andreas Christodoulou

Opinion: The real issue – nationalisation

 

The leaders debate last week brought some, but not much comment on the most important, but least talked about, issue affecting the UK. This is the fact that over the last 30 years the government, of both colour ties, has sold off the family silver in order to provide return and profit to shareholders and their friends in the city.

Nationalised companies can’t fail

The UK’s utilities network, of just gas and electricity alone, consists of multiple companies running small cut up sections of the country. How could we cut the whole of the Midlands (say) off gas if a company folds? The railway network is confusing, with the tracks owned by Network Rail, formerly Railtrack, privatised in 1996. Railtrack made massive losses following a horrible crash, then approached the government for emergency funding. The government, of course, HAD to bail Railtrack out – we can’t not have a railway network! Anyway, they immediately paid a £137m dividend to the shareholders out of the public gift.

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged | 43 Comments

Opinion: The Sun has clearly boobed on this issue of free speech

I’m frankly disgusted that The Sun has decreed that I have a right to see Prince Harry’s penis, but not Kate Middleton’s nipples. I fail to understand how my being unable to see Prince Harry naked is somehow a disgusting breach of the freedom of speech of the UK press but my being unable to see Kate Middleton naked is completely correct because this is a hideous invasion of her privacy.

Let us briefly review. Prince Harry was happily naked in a hotel room where he had a reasonable expectation of privacy, someone took photos of him from a short distance …

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged , and | 25 Comments

Opinion: Unions are not our enemy. Don’t make them into one.

The announcement yesterday by the Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS) that its members would strike on Thursday 26th July – the day before the Olympic Games begin – risks turning our country into something just shy of a laughing stock and damaging Britain’s reputation and tourism industries in the short and medium term. 

Tourism is a massive industry and hundreds of thousands of people from countries across the globe will be descending on London over the next few weeks to watch the games. Tourists bring in massive amounts of money into the country, and I’m fairly sure that everybody agrees …

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged and | 28 Comments

Opinion: Cameron’s road plan is a terrible idea

David Cameron’s announcement that he was planning on getting private enterprise to fund roads in the UK has to be a contender for the worst idea since the Potassium Teapot.

While, in principle, the idea of private enterprise building new roads isn’t necessarily a terrible idea, any private involvement in refurbishing existing roads, widening motorways or improving junctions would be a financial mess.

In this case, private enterprise would borrow some money (probably from a pension fund), widen the motorway or make the junction better, then get some sort of pay off from the Government based on road/junction usage.

Unfortunately, private businesses …

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged , and | 17 Comments

Opinion: Secularism is a friend to Religion, not its enemy

Baroness Warsi’s recent comments about secularism showed her ignorance about how it can be religion’s greatest friend, and should always be. Secularism, at its heart, represents a separation between religion and the state, which benefits both the atheist and the believer.

For atheists, secularism gives us assurance that religion will not be an officially supported part of our government system. That we will have no direct religious influence over our Government, no bishops in the House of Lords, and no official religion. Of course, we can’t stop people being elected who have religious beliefs, and their beliefs will affect their …

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged and | 36 Comments

Opinion: We should not be offended by keeping our noses out of other people’s business

Last weekend’s media was dominated by the earth shattering news that Prince Harry called a fellow soldier in the Pakistani army a “Paki”. The press have hounded him, people have accused him of racism, and the soldier’s father has spoken of his offence too.

As if this “race row” wasn’t enough to shock you to your very core, we learn that Prince Charles has been calling an Asian friend of his, Kuldip (Anglicised to Kolin in some reports) Dhillon, “Sooty” as a nickname for years without anyone taking offence at it.

As a society, we British are offended way …

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged , , and | 11 Comments
Advert



Recent Comments

  • User AvatarKatharine Pindar 5th Jul - 7:16pm
    Having listened to the excellent interview with Sir Simon Stevens again, courtesy of BBC I player, he was linking the idea that Beveridge would want...
  • User AvatarPeter 5th Jul - 6:04pm
    Antony, where are you going to get the electricity to power millions of cars, especially on a windless night. Where will you get the cobalt,...
  • User AvatarKevin Langford 5th Jul - 5:11pm
    3) on party strategy; this has many elements. In relation to the points raised a) We need to have some consistent, clear and distinctive things...
  • User AvatarKevin Langford 5th Jul - 5:10pm
    So quite a bit to respond to here - and apologies to some that I was out when this went live! To pick up three...
  • User AvatarTom Arms 5th Jul - 4:39pm
    Manfarang, I know you are right in asserting that there are Israelis who actively advocate a settlement which satisfies both the Jewish and Palestinian communities....
  • User AvatarPeter Martin 5th Jul - 4:06pm
    @ Paul Barker, In principle nothing needs a referendum. Not even a constitutional matter. But if you think you see Tory and Labour MPs voting...