31 January 2020 – today’s press release

Jane Dodds: Conservatives are backtracking on their commitment to end austerity

The Welsh Liberal Democrats are calling on the UK Government to apologise for backtracking on a key election commitment to end austerity just two months after the General Election.

Prior to the election, the Conservatives had proclaimed on a number of occasions that “Austerity is over”.

Their 2019 manifesto, upon which this Government was elected, promised the same as well as pledged numerous increases in public spending.

However, over the past two days, there have been numerous reports that the Government is, in fact, preparing to cut spending by up to 5% per department.

Due to the Barnett funding formula, any cuts to spending in England will have consequences for the amount of money the Welsh Government receives yearly.

Jane Dodds, Leader of the Welsh Liberal Democrats, said:

The news the Conservatives are backtracking on their commitment to end austerity will be a tough pill to swallow for families and communities across Wales.

This Government was elected on a clear commitment to increase public spending, not inflict further damaging cuts to our already overstretched public services.

The Chancellor needs to offer a full and frank explanation as to why, just months after being elected, the Government is already abandoning this key election pledge.

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11 Comments

  • People voted to be poorer, we should respect that wish and when they squeal refer them to Depeffle and the rest of the brave Brexiteers. I will be asking brave Sir Peter, Glen and co those questions when bad things happen, consequences my brave Brexi and Lexi’s you’ll have to justify them, bless just bless.

  • There is a difference between increased spending in certain areas and increases in overall govn spending. Making the UK Brexit ready will require a much smaller state and much lower taxes. Cutting income tax will get a mini boom going and cutting welfare will force people into the low skilled work formerly done by our European friends. Much kicking and screaming will result but the vast majority will have more dosh in their pockets and a sense of improved freedom, especially if the govn repeals the endless, pointless laws that intrude into people’s lives and toughens up on serious crime.

  • David Becket 1st Feb '20 - 9:07am

    I accept that there will be views expressed on this site that are not shared by the majority of readers. For example you can still be “liberal” and want to leave the EU. However this is a site for “liberal” views and the comment from Frank West is so opposed to “liberal” thinking that it should have been moderated out.

  • Graham Martin-Royle 1st Feb '20 - 10:40am

    Frank West said ” especially if the govn repeals the endless, pointless laws that intrude into people’s lives “.

    Could you be more specific and detail just exactly which laws you want repealed?

  • Philip Moss 1st Feb '20 - 12:30pm

    Yes, please, please please., Let me echo Graham Martin-Royle. I would like also
    to see what pointless laws we can get rid off. If Mr Frank West could give examples I would be very pleased to join him at the barricades. Thanks

  • Tony Greaves 1st Feb '20 - 3:49pm

    Why do a small number of rightwing libertarians who belong (at best) on some loony fringe of the Tory party insist on coming on this site and disrupting the discussion? Do they get some weird kind of kick from it?

  • Innocent Bystander 1st Feb '20 - 3:59pm

    I thought Paul said there was a members only site where the faithful could convince each other they are right and have always been right.
    But what good does that do?

  • Peter Martin 2nd Feb '20 - 9:06pm

    @ AlexB

    “To get government borrowing away, they must reduce spending”

    That might work for you and I because our income is independent of our spending.

    But not for Govt. If it reduces its spending it reduces its income too, as the economy becomes less buoyant. The gap between the two may well remain the same or even worsen.

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