Last print issue of Liberator now free online

Liberator 402 is on its way to subscribers and is available as a free download from our website: www.liberatormagazine.org.uk 
This is our last issue in print, and future Liberators will be free downloads from the website, which also has a free archive of copies back to 2001.

In future anyone – not just subscribers – can download and read Liberator on any device they wish, print out parts of it and pass it on to anyone interested.

We will send out email notifications when each PDF issue comes out. To be on this list please visit our website to sign up or email us at: [email protected]

Liberator 402 includes:

The Next Leader Speaks

Ed Davey and Layla Moran answer Liberator’s questions on how they would approach being Lib Dem leader

Beads Without String

Hardly anyone knows what holds Liberal Democrat policies together and the party bores and baffles the public. Michael Meadowcroft suggests some solutions

Staring us in the Face

Responses are needed to everything from a pandemic-induced recession to Black Lives Matter, and a look at Liberal history will reveal many of them, says Trevor Smith

Getting the Builders In

Susan Simmonds finds much to think about in Layla Moran’s Build Back Better booklet

Liberal Lessons About a Painful Past

More statues not fewer is the way to better reflect history – and leave Gladstone alone – says Stephen Williams

We Just Want to Breathe

Mary Page looks at how Bristol’s fallen Colston statue could point the way to a better society

The Communities the Lib Dems Ignored

Janice Turner looks at why the Liberal Democrats’ performance among black and minority ethnic voters has been so abysmal, and at one way to change that

Don’t Waste a Crisis

Recovery from Covid-19 offers a chance for a more liberal, equitable and greener economics, says Bernard Greaves

Time to Get Tough

Capitalist excesses and their consequences should be in Lib Dem sights, says William Tranby

A Market for Councils

Power should be devolved both to and by councils, which should embrace a diverse market for services, says Daniel Duggan

Plus Radical Bulletin, Letters, Reviews and Lord Bonkers’ Diary.

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5 Comments

  • A very sad day for Liberals and Liberal Democrats. The simple fact that a paper copy arrived in your letterbox meant that it was physically there and so was read, even the bits that sounded a bit boring, or too trendy lefty, or not trendy lefty enough, or just too obscure for words. Reviews of books gave an insight into things that were of little direct interest, but were still insightful in themselves, and letters were there and just because of that fact were read, thought about, and on occasion debated with oneself.

    All in all a cornucopia of insight and a never ending primer in Lib Dem philosophy and thought.

    Once online, sadly it will become just another piece of digital ephemera. Things will be skipped as not interesting enough for now, but to be looked at later – never to be considered again.

    As a party we are in crisis, on the verge of becoming totally irrelevant to the vast majority of the British people, and only listened to by other true believers. The Spectator and the New Statesman have both produced a paper edition for over 100 years, both claiming to be beacons of liberal thought (Ho Ho – Good joke that). Going forward there will be nothing for real Liberalism and the Lib Dems.

    Sadly like the much missed Liberal News, replaced by Ad Lib which faded away faster than the Cheshire Cat, then by a party website about as useful as a Chocolate Fireguard, Liberator is also disappearing into the ether, never to be seen again.

    How long before the Lib Dems do likewise?

  • I would like to think that people can read it on line AND ALSO PRINT IT OFF TO READ AT LEISURE. That way it does not get lost in the ether and can be reborn like the party will.
    Yes,the New Statesmen and Spectator should be pointed out as Neo(NON)Liberal papers but left and right viepoints.

  • Nonconformistradical 26th Jul '20 - 11:51am

    @n hunter
    “AND ALSO PRINT IT OFF TO READ AT LEISURE. That way it does not get lost in the ether”

    Rather than contribute – eventually – to the waste paper pile why not just download the pdf and save it to read at leisure as many times as you like?

  • Mark Smulian 26th Jul '20 - 12:43pm

    Liberator is most certainly not – as David Evans suggests – disappearing into the ether, but sadly many of our older readers are.
    Too few people visit conference exhibition areas for us to reach many new readers, younger people do not tend to consume print, and maintaining a subscription system creates an onerous and unproductive administrative workload.
    Liberator will therefore be free online from now on, and as other contributors here have noted, anyone is free to download it and print it off if they wish.
    We’re not changing the nature of the content, we’ll still be there as a forum for liberal debate, but we’ll be accessible to all in future, which get the issues we write about aired more widely.

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