Tag Archives: quantitative easing

Opinion: Two ways to help fix the global crisis

It has long become clear that the financial crisis has been on a scale deeper and larger than many people have suspected. It has also been exacerbated by muddled policy responses from all Governments and policy makers. Whilst the need to control debt is not in doubt, capital expenditure projects should be pursued and tighter bank regulations need introducing (with much clearer splits between retail and investment banks); all economies are still struggling.

Step one: better Quantitative Easing

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Opinion: Inflation the biggest threat to economic growth

Economic commentators and politicians searching for that most elusive of phenomena – economic growth appear to be operating a back to basics approach. The Bank of England takes the traditional neo-classical approach to its role as arbiter of monetary policy – Quantitative Easing and liquidity schemes to expand the money supply and make borrowing cheaper to incentivise businesses to expand. The government are taking a much more Keynesian route to growth, announcing house building schemes and other infrastructure initiatives in order that the state injects the demand into the economy …

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Opinion: Monetary policy is political, so where’s the democracy?

We are in extraordinary economic times, which have led to extraordinary measures from the Bank of England in its attempt to help steer us out of the storm. The Bank appears to be terrified at the prospect of deflation and the depressive effect it could have. Not only have base interest rates been pinned to a historical low of 0.5% for well over three years, the Bank has also used Quantitative Easing to pump £325 billion of newly created money into the economy.

We now know more about the effect that QE is having and it should send shivers down the …

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QE “benefits the better off” say Bank of England – so why are we still doing it?

In the first comprehensive report it has conducted into the impact of its Quantitative Easing (QE) policies on the UK economy, the Bank of England says that QE has “prevented a deeper recession” but that the policy “benefits the top 5% of households”.

It is the contention of this article that the central bank is broadly correct on both of those points-which begs the question, why is the Bank of England intent on pursuing the policy in the future?

I have previously written that QE has had the effect of preventing a deeper recession by effectively ending the credit crunch, but that it is limited in its capacity to deliver growth.

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Opinion: More QE is not the solution to Britain’s economic challenges

With the predictability of a partner changing ‘our’ plans at the last minute, the announcement that UK inflation has fallen to its lowest level for two and a half years has been greeted with calls for more Quantitative Easing (QE) to stimulate growth.

Much of the media presentation of the facts of this latest inflation data has focused on the fall being a ‘surprise’. In reality most of the drop was predictable enough, as the article I link to above states, the VAT increase in 2011 fell off the index for the first time in May, while the situation in Iran has stabilised, causing oil prices to fall.

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Opinion: Clutching at straws

I have spent the day clutching at a couple of straws.

Last week in the tractor factory Nick Clegg appeared to confuse the ‘deficit’ with the National Debt when he said, “We have a moral duty to the next generation to wipe the slate clean for them of debt. We have set out a plan – it lasts about six or seven years – to wipe the slate clean to rid people of the deadweight of debt that has been built up over time.”

It sounded like a fail in GCSE Economics. But suppose he wasn’t mistaking the policy to eliminate the structural deficit by 2017 for a moral crusade to wipe the slate clean by removing the deadweight of the National Debt, all £1,300 billion of it.

At the other end of my straw was the realisation that Nick Clegg might have become an extreme Market Monetarist and was revealing his plan to re-establish Nominal GDP back to its trend line, even if that meant buying in the whole of the National Debt in the mother of all quantitative easing exercises.

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Opinion: Getting radical with the money supply

Last week the OECD forecast that Britain was about to experience a double-dip recession, for the first time since 1975. Vince Cable in his Centreforum paper Moving from the financial crisis to sustainable growth asks “How far should monetary policy now be expanded further in the UK to boost demand and head off a period of poor growth?

He goes on to say “There is no possibility for further meaningful interest rate cuts – real short term rates are now minus 4 percent. That means further recourse to quantitative easing.

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Recent Comments

  • User AvatarManfarang 19th Mar - 12:20am
    So I am an absent minded professor ! Without the beard and sandals. Bring back the News Chronicle albeit as an internet version.
  • User AvatarJoeB 18th Mar - 11:06pm
    Michael BG, the loan is provided by the government and administered by Serco. The current rate of support for mortgage interest the government will pay...
  • User AvatarJoeB 18th Mar - 10:44pm
    Peter, the current account deficit is financed by the Capital account (financial account in the UK). The capital account measures transfer in assets and liabilities....
  • User AvatarSimon Banks 18th Mar - 9:59pm
    Some of these situations pose no great difficulties. If a human weights decisions in beauty contests or job interviews or university place decisions against Black...
  • User AvatarRoland 18th Mar - 9:36pm
    @Micheal BG >I note that the Lovemoney article talks of an interest rate of 2.2% not your 1.5%. The DWP website quotes a current figure...
  • User AvatarRoland 18th Mar - 8:53pm
    @Micheal BG - I can find no credible reference that says Serco is the loan provider, only that as said in the article, Serco were...