Tag Archives: rosie campbell

Why the ideal candidate is a local GP (who preferably left school at 18)

There’s an interesting article in Political Studies journal by Rosie Campbell and Philip Cowley which attempts to find out ‘What Voters Want’. Published last year, it looks specifically what they want in terms of the characteristics of their candidates.

The core of the study consisted of six split-sample internet surveys. Each survey involved respondents reading two short profiles about hypothetical candidates, and then answering four questions about those candidates. Following Kira Sanbonmatsu, our research design included profiles of two candidates (Sanbonmatsu, 2002), whom we (initially) called John and George:


John Burns is 48 years old, and was born and brought up in your area, before going to university to study for a degree in physics. After university John trained as an accountant, and set up a company ten years ago; it now employs seven people. John has interests in the health service, the environment, and pensions, and is married with three children.

George Mountford is 45 years old; he lives in the constituency and studied business at university.He is a solicitor and runs a busy local practice. George is passionate about education, with two children in local schools and a wife who is a primary school teacher.

Posted in What do the academics say? | Also tagged | 3 Comments

Bob Worcester forecasts Lib Dems to be reduced to 24 seats in 2015. I’ll run naked down Whitehall if that’s the result.

At a conference fringe meeting on Monday evening, the pollster’s pollster Bob Worcester, MORI’s founder, made a forecast of how many seats the Lib Dems will win at the 2015 election: 24.

His prediction was based on current polling which he’d fed into the Electoral Calculus website and implied the number should be 17. His slightly higher punt allows for known Lib Dem strengths, such as our MPs’ habit of holding on tight in seats we win through sheer Stakhonovite grit.

Forecasting the next election is a bit of a mug’s game, as the Coalition means there’s no past precedent to …

Posted in News | Also tagged , , , , , , and | 77 Comments

Running for office? What voters think of your income

Welcome to the latest in our occasional series highlighting interesting findings from academic research. Today – how voters prefer people who earn less rather than more.

The findings come from research presenting the details of two fictional candidates to voters and asking them what they thought of each. Details of one of the fictional candidates were then altered to see how that changed the reaction of voters.

Here is what voters were initially told about that person:

John Burns is 48 years old, and was born and brought up in your area, before going to University to study for a degree in mathematics.

Posted in What do the academics say? | Also tagged | 5 Comments
Advert



Recent Comments

  • User AvatarJoe Bourke 2nd Jun - 6:36pm
    Nick, I think you are a little too pessimistic about tax reform. This crisis may well provide the impetus for the kind of international cooperation...
  • User AvatarPeter Martin 2nd Jun - 5:55pm
    @ JoeB, "However, the UK has had a persistent deficit since the mid-1980s and a persistent current account deficit over the longer-term is another matter."...
  • User AvatarJohn 2nd Jun - 5:47pm
    There are an awful lot of past battles being poured over. Not many people are talking about the issues of the future. Policies need to...
  • User AvatarJulian Tisi 2nd Jun - 5:42pm
    No. We need to start talking to people about the issues that matter to them, not niche interests that matter only to us. Our philosophy...
  • User AvatarSimon McGrath 2nd Jun - 5:41pm
    "While people in the UK were suffering all manner of deprivation and threats to life, resistance forces in France and other countries were making their...
  • User AvatarNick Shcherban 2nd Jun - 5:34pm
    Hellow again Toby Keynes “ big media groups will be able to pour resources into supporting their preferred candidates” Yes this would be a bit...