Author Archives: Jack Haines

How do the Lib Dems survive a stronger than ever two-party system?

During this General Election campaign I spent my time helping my local party and in the last week, helping in a target seat. It became clear that this election wasn’t a Brexit election but instead a clear battle between Corbyn and May, Red vs Blue.

The policies of the Lib Dems didn’t seem to resonate nationally even though they were clearly sensible and credible, which lead to our party’s vote share declining by 0.5% compared to 2015. From this it’s clear to see that tactical voting damaged the party in nine target seats leading to deposits been lost in the most extreme circumstances. With the two main parties obtaining a collective 82.4% of the vote, higher than any election since 1970, we need to focus on surviving in a two party system now more than ever.

While our vote share did decline, we did however make net gains but also losing some of the party’s best talent like Nick Clegg on the way. The fact that the party could still make gains in such a tough political climate for third parties is a demonstration for future survival. Targeting the right seats with a mass amount of resources from the central party and the nearby local parties shows how, as a party, we can still stand toe-to-toe with the two larger parties.

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged | 18 Comments

Is an era of bipartisanship achievable in the UK?

 

Although relatively unheard of in the UK political system, bipartisanship is the idea of two opposing sides finding common ground and compromising in key areas. This form of politics was commonly found in the US political system which featured the Republicans and Democrats working together on political and social reforms to benefit the country, before there was such polarisation in American politics.

The prime example of bipartisanship in the UK was the 2010 coalition government. This coalition was the illustration of two parties being able to work collaboratively on policy agreements. Essentially it could be argued that the most effective accountability and scrutiny was provided inside the government itself with two contrasting parties having to agree on policy before it was passed.

With this in mind I feel that it’s time for an era of unity and bipartisanship in the political system. With division sparked massively in the UK as a result of the EU Referendum there is a need for cross party agreement and progression more than ever on multiple key areas such as the NHS, terrorism and Brexit.

Posted in Op-eds | 22 Comments

Fighting for votes at 16

In light of the recent referendum result, as a Young Liberal, I have found this result  disheartening and frustrating. Joining the party at 16 and now being 17, I have not yet been able to exercise my voice and vote in any democratic election aside from the Liberal Democrat leadership election. This matter disappoints me and,  I’m sure,  many other politically passionate 16 and 17 year olds massively.

From a personal perspective I cannot help but feel that there is an enormous need for change to cater for this currently unheard voice in politics. I and many other young people have been active  in the political landscape since the day I joined the party yet feel angry that I am not allowed to exercise my passionate views through a vote.

Young people have shouted louder than ever on the issue of the European Union and I feel unsatisfied and discouraged that David Cameron declined me and other 16 and 17 year olds the right to vote on an issue that has shifted the tectonic plates of British politics more than any other issue in recent times.

It is clear that young people favoured Remain by a landslide yet they did not get the decision they wanted. It could be argued that this is down to a lack of a voice amongst young people, but also the lack of action to energise the base of young people in the United Kingdom and galvanise their opinion on the issues that will affect their everyday lives and also their future.

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged , and | 9 Comments
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Recent Comments

  • User AvatarInnocent Bystander 23rd Apr - 8:07am
    David, Then why didn't these powerful lies work on you? If they worked on others? Do you consider yourself as "those people"? Or are they...
  • User AvatarRichard Easter 23rd Apr - 7:44am
    As for ID cards, wasn't the complaint related to them being biometric and all the information they would keep - for example all known addresses,...
  • User AvatarRichard Easter 23rd Apr - 7:41am
    TIG / Change UK are not liberals. They are a mixture of Europhile Labour neo-cons, Pro EU Thatcherites and the politically homeless who have no...
  • User Avatartonyhill 23rd Apr - 7:13am
    As the subject of ID cards has come up several times in relation to Change UK, and comments from LibDems in response seem largely in...
  • User AvatarNonconformistradical 23rd Apr - 7:11am
    @Katherine Pindar "Perhaps her generous withdrawal will cause a rethink by the Change UK leaders, which would be a real boost to the possibility of...
  • User AvatarIan 23rd Apr - 7:06am
    The answer to the question at the top of the article is that they would be worth joining if they represented the best way of...