Tag Archives: no deal brexit

5-6 September 2019 – two days of press releases

Gosh, that’s embarrassing. Yesterday evening, I came home from a meeting of my County Association of Local Councils and felt the urge to both write it up for my blog and produce a report for my Parish Council and clean forgot about Liberal Democrat Voice. And so, you get a bumper(ish) edition at the end of what has been an utterly bewildering week…

  • Luciana Berger MP joins the Liberal Democrats (covered here)
  • Lib Dem membership rises to over 120,000
  • Bill to stop no-deal passes through the Lords
  • Lib Dem membership rises to over 120,000

    The Liberal Democrats have today announced that there are

Posted in News | Also tagged , , and | 3 Comments

Members must decide!

Election pacts and participation in an Emergency Government need to be agreed by members.  

As a No Deal Brexit and a possible General Election get nearer there has been much talk of how we Remainers can stop it. The focus at the moment is on legislation to stop it but there are two other areas said to be under discussion: 

  • An emergency government to hold a referendum followed by a General Election 
  • A ‘Remain alliance‘ so that in key seats Remain parties don’t stand against each other (though  Alastair Carmichael has been reported as saying we would not stand down for the SNP).  

I believe that it is really important that we don’t abandon one of the fundamental principles of our Party – the primacy of members in taking key decisions  

If we participate in an emergency  Government then our Constitution is very clear about what needs to happen. Section 23 says that support for a government which contains other political parties applies

where the Parliamentary Party in the House of Commons (‘the Commons Party’) enters into negotiations with one or more other political parties with a view to the formation of a government supported by the party and such party or parties; 

There are various provisions about consultations  etc but the key point is that  any agreement would have to be approved by  a 2/3rd vote at either a regular or special Conference.  

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged , , , and | 11 Comments

Chuka Umunna MP writes…Lib Dems are the only party committed to stopping Brexit and tackling the causes of Brexit

As the Conservative leadership contest draws to a close, with both Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt putting fresh paint on the impossible red lines set out by the Leave campaign, the threat of a a No Deal Brexit is closer than ever.

Both candidates are disregarding all the facts about the disastrous consequences this would have for the UK, with Boris Johnson even searching for ways to suspend Parliament to circumvent MPs to run down the clock to exit day.

Such a move would not only be a democratic outrage, but herald one of the most destructive acts of self harm on the UK ever willingly committed by our government. 

On Thursday, the Office for Budget Responsibility published its fiscal risks report. Commissioned in 2015, the report sets out to analyse the risks to public finances over the short to medium term. 

This year, the OBR devoted an entire chapter to assessing the risk of a No Deal Brexit to the UK’s finances and the findings were jaw-dropping.

Here are just 10 things the OBR warns would happen under Boris Johnson’s No Deal Brexit scenario:

1) The UK would enter a “year-long recession” at the end of 2019, with real GDP immediately falling by 2.1%.

2) The value of the pound would depreciate by 10% immediately, and remain low until at least 2024.

3) Business investment would drop due to trade costs, economic uncertainty and loss of some export markets.

4) Residential Investment and consumer spending would fall as real household income is squeezed.

5) Productivity growth would become even weaker, and remain below current projections until 2024. 

6) The growth in earnings would slow even further and remain so for the first few years.

7) Real wages would become “significantly lower”, by as much as 2.5% by 2024 compared to the last forecast.

8) Borrowing would be around £30bn a year higher from 2020-21 onwards due to tax receipts falling. This means no fiscal headroom at all for any of the tax and spend promises of Boris Johnson or Jeremy Hunt, or to allow the government to end austerity.

9) The overall impact of a No Deal Brexit and then trading on WTO rules would be a hit to GDP of 5.9%.

10) If a No Deal, WTO Brexit was combined with a stricter immigration policy for EU citizens, this hit to GDP would rise substantially, potentially as high as 9% according to the Government’s own figures.

On top of this, Brexit has already resulted in a weak pound, which has lost 17% of its value against the dollar since the 2016 vote; higher inflation; big falls in manufacturing output, construction, and business investment; and we have not even left the EU yet. 

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged , and | 19 Comments
Advert



Recent Comments

  • User AvatarRichard Underhill. 14th Oct - 7:38pm
    Peter Martin 14th Oct '19 - 11:59am The Independent had a cynical comic strip which is now in the Daily Telegraph. Do you agree that...
  • User AvatarRichard Underhill. 14th Oct - 7:25pm
    Senator Elizabeth Warren can win the US Presidency in 2020. Sunday Times 13/10/19, Main News section Page 25, columns 2-4. Niall Ferguson, Hoover Institution, Stanford....
  • User AvatarArnold Kiel 14th Oct - 6:29pm
    In my logic, any sovereign activity, i.e. any exercise of power over citizens should be publicly run: prisons, probation, social "services" awarding (e.g.means-testing), or decisions...
  • User AvatarPaul Barker 14th Oct - 6:01pm
    The really big argument against Labour is that they are pulling the usual Right-Wing Populist trick of saying two contradictory things at the same time...
  • User AvatarColin Paine 14th Oct - 5:10pm
    Good to see Chuka distancing us from Labour on this, let's hope we do the same as regards their policy on renationalisng the energy industry.
  • User AvatarChris Cory 14th Oct - 5:04pm
    Agree with David R. Being interested in economic/business policy I just looked on the Lib Dem Business and Entepreneurs website (as mentioned above). Full membership...