Author Archives: Patrick Maxwell

What next?

Theresa May’s Brexit deal is dead in the water. This has been true for a while, but with no obvious mandate for the Withdrawal Agreement, however it is tweaked, the political future for the Prime Minister looks bleak. Her steel and resilience have been tested many times before and have so far survived, but the seemingly hopeless situation before her now may be the final time that Mrs May bleats out her rhetorical tangents. With a government in disarray and a poignantly undecided Opposition, the Lib Dems need to find a logical and realistic Parliamentary solution to break the impasse.

There is not yet any majority for anything in the House of Commons. The next few weeks may well change that, but it shall be a time of unprecedented turmoil and uncertainty. Mrs May was perhaps correct to say earlier yesterday that no Brexit has a more genuine chance of getting through Parliament than no-deal. Let us hope so. That said, it will certainly take some trying to turn over the referendum result in such a short period of time. 

The hard-Brexit rabble have proved themselves to be zealous and ineffective over the year, and their logistical failures in the Commons are doomed to continue. If there is a majority for one thing on the green benches, it is that against no-deal. The very notion of not having a proper and palatable relationship with the largest trading block in the world seems impractical at best and economically cataclysmic at worst. The first mission of the small yellow-striped army inside the Commons should therefore be to rally against such an eventuality. 

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged | 25 Comments

Brexit cannot be the sole issue of the Lib Dems

As the 29th of March comes ominously closer, the eerie reality of the political situation in Westminster is slowly becoming clearer. The Commons is in deadlock, with none of the solutions proposed gaining signification support on the green benches and party infighting rife. This is, however, nothing inherently new.

When faced with such monumental events such as these, the responsible and pragmatic response from our politicians would be a compromise.

A ‘Government of National Unity’ has been proposed, but in such times, the idea of unity it is, as always, an illusion. The country is evidently deeply divided, as is Parliament. No …

Posted in Op-eds | Tagged | 37 Comments
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Recent Comments

  • User Avatarexpats 24th Jan - 8:44am
    Michael 23rd Jan '19 - 10:47pm....................We already had a “people’s vote”, and the people voted to leave. You might not like it, but we can’t...
  • User Avatarfrankie 24th Jan - 7:47am
    It is worth pointing out ( not for the first time and certainly not for the last) that because Brexit is so vague each Brexiteer...
  • User AvatarThomas 24th Jan - 7:18am
    Gladstone... He was a hypocrite who preached "moralist foreign policy" but in fact supported that illegitimate, reactionary slave state formed by a bunch of slave-owning...
  • User AvatarJoseph Bourke 24th Jan - 1:36am
    As the prospect of a Brexit election subsides in the face of projections of another hung parliament and the Labour leadership procrastinate on getting behind...
  • User AvatarChristopher Haigh 24th Jan - 12:03am
    There basically three types of breciteers within the Tory party - one of them divided into two sub groups. There are the Little Englanders (...
  • User AvatarRoland 23rd Jan - 11:33pm
    @Peter Martin - re: Matthew Green His point is interesting, however, if the UK does crash out, don't expect the EU to leave the pre-Brexit...