Tag Archives: brexit

Make Britain Great Again! First, though, the sacrifices…

Deep in our human consciousness is a memory handed down from generation to generation for thousands of years. It is that to propitiate our gods, whoever they may be, it’s necessary to sacrifice something valuable on their altars. This will persuade the god to look favourably on the giver and be good to him. Gods could shape Fate, so to make a sacrifice, part of an act of worship supervised by priests, was a necessary ritual.

I believe that this folk memory of necessary sacrifice to keep oneself safe has surfaced again in the unconscious of British people today, and affects …

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | 82 Comments

Brexit impact ████████ likely to be █████████

As we know, the Government has ███████████ fifty-█████ reports covering sectors as diverse as █████████, ███████, ████████ █████ Banking, and Higher ███████████. Understandably, people ██████ in those █████ wanted to know precisely how ████████ they were.

In what has been a regular ████████, the ███████, led by the ████████-in-███████ ████████ ██████ decreed that we mere ████████ were too ███████ ████████ ███████ to ██████ the contents.

So, finally, after months of pointless █████████, the massed forces of ██████, the L█████l Democrats, the Scottish National ██████, and the likelihood of rebel ████████ forced the ██████████ into a humiliating ██████████.

But no sooner were the █████████ out of the ███████ than certain Government figures exposed their ████████, ████████ing to ███████ out of a tight hole.

Lord Callanan, Brexit ████████ in the Lords’ ██████, claimed that while the motion ████████ ██ impact statements, the ███████ had actually █████ ████ ██████ ██████ sectoral analyses. A neat bit of █████████ by the Noble ████.

Posted in Humour and Op-eds | 11 Comments

Countering the fear factor

Our ancestors were hunter-gatherers who rarely met anyone they didn’t know, and were probably wise to be cautious when they did. In modern cities we are used to seeing strangers by the thousand, but our genetic inheritance is still there, and it is easy to re-awaken the atavistic fear that people who look or sound different might be dangerous. Stirring up racism is part of a simple principle of leadership; tell people there is an external threat and set yourself up as a powerful and angry leader. If the people fear the external threat they will welcome an aggressive masterful …

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | 109 Comments

Let’s Replace the Tories!

I can see three possible conclusions to the Brexit debacle. First, we’ll crash out the EU without a deal. Second, Brexit will become untenable and we’ll have to end up staying in the EU. And third, we’ll be stuck in a transitional limbo with a debilitated leadership and endless bureaucratic wrangling that may further weaken our economy and global reputation. Nevertheless, if we ever get through this mess, we will most certainly hit rock bottom. However good this imaginary deal might be, relations with our European partners will have been broken beyond repair. We need to prepare ourselves for any …

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | 48 Comments

Brexit will unravel

So, the children snatched the keys of the family car. They haven’t a clue how to drive it. They’ve locked the doors. You can’t make them listen. You watch helplessly. It shudders forward as they fight amongst themselves. They won’t unlock or take notice until they’ve driven it into the sea. They’re convinced it’s amphibious!

What can you do? How can we stop them driving over the cliff?

…The story of Brexit so far.

But I don’t believe the car will topple off the cliff. It’ll either run out of fuel, conk out, hit a tree or run into a ditch. The occupants may be badly injured. But letting the consequences of their naïve bluster come face to face with harsh and unforgiving reality would be far worse.

Brexit will unravel. Most but not all of the ingredients are there.

The Government will never put a figure on UK liabilities; fearing the consequences of a backlash from their own supports if the figure isn’t a big fat zero! There’s no plausible solution to the Irish border conundrum. Neither ‘soft’ nor ‘transitional’ arrangements are possible so long as the shrill voices of Tory Europhobes dominate the airwaves.

In truth, negotiations have already all but broken down. Theresa May’s European counterparts may feel genuine sympathy for the impossible position in which she now finds herself. But this’ll count for nothing during merciless deal settling.

However, many ‘Remainers’ have become ‘futile resigners’; in that they are resigned to leave and believe it’s futile to hold out hope of stopping it.

In spite of the daily diet which exposes the Brexit negotiators’ buffoonery, humiliation and chaotic ineptitude most have given up or are convinced it would be improper to deny brexiteers their entitlement… even if it’s an entitlement to undermine Britain’s economic prospects, it’s standing in the world, and to become more isolationist and inward-looking. A crucial factor favouring brexit is the persistence of public opinion which still appears to be on side.

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | 35 Comments

Tom Brake MP writes…If you care about Brexit, read this…

Some of you might have received an email from me on Thursday night about the EU Withdrawal Bill. If you didn’t, then please continue reading.

When people voted in the EU referendum last year, nobody really knew what a future deal with the European Union might look like.

16 months on it is now clearer than ever that no deal will be anywhere near as good a deal as the one we have now. To top that off, a catastrophic “no deal” scenario is becoming likelier than ever.

The chaos and uncertainty are leading to job losses and higher prices across the UK.

That is why the Liberal Democrats believe the people deserve the final say on any Brexit deal in a referendum. And if the public doesn’t like it, we should have the option to remain in the European Union.

In two weeks’ time, MPs will be debating amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill. The Government’s majority is wafer thin – and if MPs from all parties work together, there’s a real chance we can defeat them and at the very least, stop them from pursuing a hard Brexit.

Posted in News | Also tagged , and | 44 Comments

Theresa May

I have been struggling for a while to work out Theresa May’s mentality. I have read, as we all have, something of her origins – the vicar’s daughter who ran through a field of wheat. I am aware of her time at the Home Office where she adopted regressive policies in a pusillanimously oppressive way. I am aware of her stance on the referendum – I find it interesting now that people describe her as a remainer, when it seems to me that the most important thing about her stance at the time was its invisibility.

Then a single word popped into my head which seemed to have a great deal of traction, the word “provincial”. It comes straight from the pages of Trollope, and describes the mindset, which he sometimes satirised to great effect, of the solidly conservative yeoman class which ran the shires of England in the mid nineteenth century. There is much in common between then and now, times of turbulence when the world is changing, power can move with quicksilver speed, the very ground under our feet seems to be shifting, and those determined to hold what they have must work very hard to ensure that things stay the same. There is a concern about standards, loyalty, patriotism (though never stridently stated). There is a feeling that everything will be better if people know their place and stick to it. And there is a feeling that one must never question too closely or demand an account of the people who claim to rule on our behalf. The refusal to publish the Brexit impact papers comes to mind.

Above all these, the key component is a lack of imagination. Or, rather, more than that, there is a refusal to have an imagination. If you have an imagination, then you can imagine things being different, and then you can imagine the status quo being different, and, in the mind of the provincial, who knows what might happen then?

Posted in Op-eds | Also tagged | 38 Comments
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Recent Comments

  • User AvatarJeff 23rd Nov - 11:54pm
    @ Sean Hyland. Subsequently upheld unanimously by the Supreme Court.
  • User AvatarKatharine Pindar 23rd Nov - 11:52pm
    Thank you, Palehorse. that is all right then. I think we political activists need to be listening to each other and debating fair-mindedly. But I...
  • User AvatarDavid Raw 23rd Nov - 11:36pm
    @ Richard Underhill Your post about Nobby Stiles earlier today was in very bad taste.
  • User AvatarSean Hyland 23rd Nov - 11:29pm
    @Jeff - thanks for that. Wasn't aware of that case.
  • User AvatarJeff 23rd Nov - 11:22pm
    Sean Hyland 23rd Nov '17 - 10:50pm: I actually put on another thread on this site that I believed that UK nationals resident in EU...
  • User AvatarGlenn 23rd Nov - 10:58pm
    Noncomformistliberal/ I was just pointing out the economy hasn't been that great for decades and that this tends to be obscured by Europhiles. The logic...